Churchill’s Thin Grey Line: British Merchant Ships at War 1939-1945

While Edwards’ new book might be seen as just another book on the history of the naval war during World War II it provides valuable insights into a particular aspect of this war that is well known by specialists but nevertheless often overlooked or mentioned only in a brief paragraph: the activities of the British

Heroes of Coastal Command: The RAF’s Maritime War 1939-1945

During the Interwar Years, the leaders of the Royal Air Force preached that the next war would be a short war. The war would be won by bombers which, in a matter of days, would inflict so much damage on the enemy’s urban centers that the civilian outcry would force the country’s leaders to surrender.

British Cruiser Warfare: The Lessons of the Early War, 1939-1941

Alan Raven builds on his previous work on British battleships and cruisers to analyze the experience of British cruisers as a weapon system in the Second World War.[1] He emphasizes the operational and tactical employment of cruisers and focuses on the early war years since “most of the significant lessons of the naval fighting were

Dunkirk: Nine Days that Saved an Army

Dunkirk – the port city of northern France calls to mind many different images and descriptions from the Second World War, e.g., the greatest evacuation of all time, a miracle, a methodical retreat, a tactical disaster, an allied defeat, and on and on. It was an exceptional withdrawal from an untenable battle front, and a

German Destroyers (ShipCraft #25)

Robert Brown’s German Destroyers is an impressively concise work which expertly details the Kriegsmarine’s destroyer classes of World War II in such a manner as to please the historian, ship modeler and naval enthusiast simultaneously in a thoughtful and energetic presentation well supported by a range of varying images. Brown divides the 64-page book into

German Submarine U-1105 “Black Panther”: The Naval Archaeology of a U-boat

Aaron S. Hamilton earned a Bachelor’s and Master’s degree in History in 1995 at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia and calls himself an avocational historian and amateur maritime archaeologist. Hamilton has spent more than twenty years working with primary source documents related to the last year of World War II. His thesis was on

Building for Battle: U-Boat Pens of the Atlantic Battle

Philip Kaplan is a well-established author with some forty titles spanning aviation, naval and general military subjects such as Wolfpack, Chariots of Fire, Little Friends, Grey Wolves and One Last Look. In this work, [apparently] the second Kaplan wrote for the “Building for Battle” series from Pen & Sword, he tackles the subject of the

A Hard Fought Ship

If the employment of destroyers during peace time and war time is of interest to you, this is a must-read book. The authors have crafted one of the finest ship histories this reviewer has encountered. HMS Venomous was one of the 67 V and W class destroyers built by the Royal Navy during the last

The King George V Class Battleships

The story of the Royal Navy during World War II often centers around one of the five battleships of the King George V Class (KGV): HMS King George V, HMS Prince of Wales, HMS Duke of York, HMS Anson, and HMS Howe. The author of this book has crafted a tour de force that examines

British Destroyer vs German Destroyer: Narvik 1940

David Greentree and David Campbell’s British Destroyer vs. German Destroyer: Narvik 1940 presents a concise yet detailed look at the destroyers of the two major belligerents during the oft-ignored 1940 Norway campaign that encompasses key aspects that provide the reader a refreshing glimpse from a lower level than the normal histories typically offer, the sea-tossed

The War with Hitler’s Navy

Adrian Stewart was educated at Rugby School before taking First Class Honours at Caius College, Cambridge. Caius is also the alma mater of the broadcaster David Frost, physicist Stephen Hawking, and historian Simon Sebag Montefiore. Stewart lives near Rugby a market town in Warwickshire, West Midlands, England, close to the River Avon. He is a

War at Sea: A Shipwrecked History

James P. Delgado is a maritime archaeologist, explorer, story-teller, acclaimed author, television host, and explorer who spent nearly four decades in underwater exploration. A native of California, he earned his doctorate in Archaeology from Simon Fraser University, has an M.A. in Maritime Studies from East Carolina University, and took his B.A. in History from San

The Dunkirk Evacuation in 100 Objects

Martin Mace has a wealth of knowledge in writing about military history. Currently, he is the editor for Frontline Books and has over twenty years of experience in publishing and journalism. He has published several books on the subject and has co-authored multiple best-selling titles. In addition, he is the founding editor of Britain at

Destroyers at Normandy

For many years the Naval Historical Foundation published a naval historical blue booklet series on a broad range of topics ranging from John Paul Jones, the resignation of officers of the U.S. Navy at the outbreak of the Civil War, and even a history of the Main Navy Building once located on Independence Avenue in

Pacific Thunder

World War II was an air war. That is not to say that other arms were not important, they certainly were, but as the war progressed, victory at sea or on the ground grew to be difficult, if not impossible, without at least local air superiority. Underscoring the importance of air power at sea, Thomas