BOOK REVIEW – A WWI Soldier and His Camera: Army 19th Engineers Seen Through Pvt. Emil Rezek’s Camera and His Duty with the 14-inch Naval Railway Gun

By William J. Brown. Self-Published (2017) Reviewed by Charles H. Bogart This book was written by the son-in-law of Emil Rezek who, in 1917 at the age of 18, joined the U.S. Navy. Not finding the Navy to his liking, Emil left his ship, changed into civilian clothes and joined the U.S. Army. In August

World War I Centennial Symposium: The Thirst is Real

By Matthew Eng “History never repeats itself. Sometimes, it rhymes” – Dr. Sean McMeekin A packed crowd huddled into the MacArthur Memorial Theater in Norfolk, VA yesterday to listen to several well-known authors and historians speak on various topics surrounding the First World War. The Memorial graciously hosted the World War I Centennial Symposium (2014-2018) in

World War I-Era Naval Aviation Material donated to National Naval Aviation Museum

The Naval Historical Foundation recently received some very interesting pieces of naval aviation memorabilia from the descendants of Ensign Dudley C. Lunt, USNRF.  Lunt enlisted in the Naval Reserve in March 1918 and was called into active service shortly thereafter.  He found himself at a ground school for aviation cadets at the Massachusetts Institute of

Call for Papers: “The Anglo-German Naval Arms Race and the First World War at Sea”

This conference (16-18 July 2014) aims to explore the Anglo-German naval arms race during the early twentieth century and the Great War at sea with an emphasis prior to the Battle of Jutland. Any methodological approach and any aspect of the naval history of this period will be very welcome, including papers addressing French, Austro-Hungarian,

shenk americas black sea fleet

BOOK REVIEW – America’s Black Sea Fleet: The U.S. Navy Amidst War and Revolution, 1919-1923

By Robert Shenk, Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, MD. (2012). Reviewed by David F. Winkler, Ph.D. I wrote the dust-jacket promotion blurb for this book where I suggested this book be considered for the CNO’s reading list – for good reasons – this book provides a historical account of the post-World War I history where revolutionary