History of Naval Aviation Part 3 – “Flight Quarters in the Nation’s Capital”

By NHF Staff Historian Dr. Dave Winkler    Sea Power, October 2016 On April 10, 1922, at hearings of the Senate Subcommittee of Naval Affairs, Sen. David I. Walsh of Massachusetts asked Lt. Willis B. Haviland, a pilot who had been assigned to a recently commissioned ship, “What is the Langley?” Haviland responded, “She is a poor excuse for

Polaris: The Chief Scientist’s Recollection of the American North Pole Expedition

During the second half of the 19th century the North Pole became the ultimate goal of polar research and various nations stepped up to organize expeditions to reach 90-degree North. After expeditions like the First and Second German North Polar Expedition failed to reach this goal, it was the US to give it another try.

2014 NHF Annual Membership Meeting

  You are cordially invited to attend the Naval Historical Foundation’s Annual Membership Meeting on Saturday morning, June 14th 2014—Flag Day!  Our David T. Leighton lecturer Steve Vogel of the Washington Post, author of the acclaimed Through the Perilous Fight: Six Weeks That Saved the Nation will speak to our membership. With this August marking the bicentennial of the British

WNY Then and Now: Building No. 142 and 201

We would like to introduce a new segment to the NHF Blog page: Washington Navy Yard: Then and Now.  We will be showing the growth and changes in Washington Navy Yard history from yesterday through today.  Today’s images discuss Building 201, just a few blocks from the National Museum of the United States Navy. The

19th Century Technology Center Becomes 21st Century Museum

By Caitlin Schettino, NHF Historical Services The Cold War Gallery of the U.S. Navy Museum is located in Building 70 on the Washington Navy Yard in southeast DC, overlooking the Anacostia River. In the early twentieth century the building housed the first naval towing tank facility. The Experimental Model Basin (EMB), the first in the