domienik-eugene-yorktown

BOOK REVIEWS – I Remember the Yorktown; They Called Me Wee Vee; Apology

Reviewed by Charles Bogart I Remember the Yorktown (2006) is the first of three self-published books that Gene Domienik has written concerning his service in the U. S. Navy during World War II. The book focuses on his tour of duty onboard Yorktown (CV 5) from October 1941 to its loss at the Battle of

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BOOK REVIEW – Fighting for MacArthur: The Navy and Marine Corps’ Desperate Defense of the Philippines

By John Gordon, Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, MD, (2011). Reviewed by Captain Roger F. Jones, U.S. Navy (Retired) This is a book well worth reading from several standpoints. First, the role of the Navy and Marine Corps in the defense of the Philippines in World War II, as compared to the Army, is not generally

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BOOK REVIEW – McNamara, Clifford, and the Burdens of Vietnam, 1965-69

By Edward J. Drea, Washington, D.C.:Historical Office, Office of the Secretary of Defense, (2011). Reviewed by Dr. Richard P. Hallion The historians within the Office of the Secretary of Defense have established an enviable reputation for meticulously researched and well-crafted books, particularly their series on the various Secretaries of Defense. Edward J. Drea’s impressive new

BOOK REVIEW – The Admirals: Nimitz, Halsey, Leahy, and King – The Five-Star Admirals Who Won the War at Sea

By Walter R. Borneman, Little, Brown and Company, New York, NY (2012). Reviewed by Captain Scott Mobley, U.S. Navy (Retired) Millions of men and women have served in the U.S. Navy since its founding more than two centuries ago, but only four attained five-star status. The circumstances of World War II propelled this quartet—William D.

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BOOK REVIEW – The Twilight War: The Secret History of America’s Thirty Year Conflict with Iran

By David Crist, Ph.D. Penquin Press, New York, NY (2012) Reviewed by Stephen Phillips The Cold War by definition gave birth to several proxy wars. Concern over the Soviet Union’s potential impact on the oil producing Middle East led the U.S. to support Shah of Iran. Though secular, the Shah became extremely oppressive and thus

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BOOK REVIEWS – A Dog Before A Soldier: Almost-lost Episodes in the U.S. Navy’s Civil War

By Chuck Veit, Self-Published, United States (2010) Reviewed by Nathan Albright Chuck Veit, the President of the Naval & Marine Living History Association and founder of the U.S. Naval Landing Party, has managed an impressive feat in A Dog Before A Soldier. In this self-published collection of essays, Veit has written something that will be

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BOOK REVIEW – Isaiah’s Eagles Rising: A Generation of Airmen (Second Edition)

By Bernard Thomas Nolan, Xlibris Corporation, Bloomington, IN (2012). Reviewed by Richard P. Hallion, Ph.D. Privately published memoirs constitute a mixed-bag of literature, with many generally offering more opinion than substance. However, bomber pilot Bernard Thomas Nolan’s Isaiah’s Eagles Rising constitutes a very definite exception to this “rule.” It is at times a gripping account

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BOOK REVIEW – Normandy: A Graphic History of D-Day

Written and Illustrated by Wayne Vansant. Zenith Press, Minneapolis, MN. (2012) Reviewed by John R. Satterfield, DBA. Scholars, writers, history buffs, movie producers and participants have minutely explored D-Day and the Normandy campaign. Thanks to thousands of books, articles and dramatic and documentary films, we are able to trace the activities and experiences of nearly

BOOK REVIEW – The Sailing Frigate: A History in Ship Models

By Robert Gardiner, Seaforth Publishing (distributed by Naval Institute Press in the United States), (2013). Reviewed by Mark Lardas Robert Gardiner’s latest book, The Sailing Frigate: A History in Ship Models, illustrates why he is so highly-regarded. He has previously written three other books about that cover frigate development from the 1740s through the end

BOOK REVIEW – In the Shadow of Greatness: Voices of Leadership, Sacrifice, and Service from America’s Longest War

By Joshus Welle, John Ennis, Katherine Kranz, and Graham Plaster, Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, MD (2012) Reviewed by Stephen Phillips All midshipmen realize that they have volunteered for service. However, as they started the fall semester of their senior year, the U.S. Naval Academy Class of 2002 could not have predicted that they would become

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BOOK REVIEW – Three Splendid Little Wars: The Diary of Joseph K. Taussig 1898-1901

Evelyn Cherpak, Ed. Newport, RI: Naval War College Press, (2009). Reviewed by Kenneth J. Blume, Ph.D. This fascinating volume offers an inside look at a young naval officer’s encounters with several of the signature moments of American military and diplomatic history between 1898 and 1901. Joseph K. Taussig (1877-1947) was at Annapolis when the Spanish-American

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BOOK REVIEW – The United States Coast Guard and National Defense: A History from World War I to the Present

By Thomas P. Ostrom., McFarland & Company, Jefferson, NC. (2012). Reviewed by Charles H. Bogart Anyone interested in the United States Coast Guard will want to read this well-written and researched book. The book consists of fifteen chapters and three appendices. Each chapter and appendices is a stand-alone article on the history of the Coast

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BOOK REVIEW – The Navy in Norco

By Kevin Bash and Brigitte Louxtel. Arcadia Publishing, Mount Pleasant SC. (2011) Reviewed by Charles H. Bogart This book is part of the Images of America series. Norco, California, is located some 50 miles east of Long Beach. On 8 November 1941, the U.S. Navy began proceedings to purchase the bankrupt 700-acre Norconian Resort and

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BOOK REVIEW – British Light Cruisers 1939-45

By Angus Konstam, illus. by Paul Wright, Osprey Publishing, Oxford, UK. (2012). Reviewed by Richard P. Hallion, Ph.D. Generally speaking, light cruisers have not received as much attention from historians and novelists as have other vessels, though they have figured in two of the great novels of naval warfare—C. S. Forester’s The Ship, and Alistair