Native Americans and Alaskan Natives in the U.S. Navy

“Since 1776, when General George Washington began enlisting American Indians for his Army, Navy, and Marines, American Indians have contributed significantly to the defense of our nation. During the Civil War, 20,000 American Indians served with Union forces both at sea and on the land. During World War I, although ineligible for the draft, 15,000

Hispanic Americans in the U.S. Navy

As of June 2018, approximately 59,000 active and Reserve Sailors of Hispanic heritage serve in the U.S. Navy contributing to the strength of the nation’s force. Hispanic Americans’ military service dates back to the Civil War. The tradition of observing Hispanic heritage began in 1968, when President Lyndon B. Johnson designated a week in mid-September

African Americans in the U.S. Navy

“Today’s African American Sailors stand proudly knowing the accomplishments of their predecessors, including the eight black Sailors who earned the Medal of Honor during the Civil War; Dick Henry Turpin, one of the survivors of the explosion aboard the battleship Maine; and the 14 black female yeomen who enlisted during World War I. The Navy planted the seeds

Women in the U.S. Navy

“The first women to serve in the U.S. Navy were nurses, beginning with the “Sacred Twenty” appointed after Congress established the Navy Nurse Corps on 13 May 1908. The first large-scale enlistment of women into the Navy met clerical shortages during World War I, and the second came months before the United States entered World

The War with Hitler’s Navy

Adrian Stewart was educated at Rugby School before taking First Class Honours at Caius College, Cambridge. Caius is also the alma mater of the broadcaster David Frost, physicist Stephen Hawking, and historian Simon Sebag Montefiore. Stewart lives near Rugby a market town in Warwickshire, West Midlands, England, close to the River Avon. He is a

Progressives in Navy Blue

Progressives in Navy Blue: Maritime Strategy, American Empire, and the Transformation of U.S. Naval Identity, 1873-1898 By Scott Mobley, Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, MD. (2017). Reviewed by CDR John T. Kuehn, USN (Ret.)   This book is part of a series edited by historians Chris Bell and Jim Bradford published by the Naval Institute. It

US Navy F-4 Phantom II Units of the Vietnam War 1969 – 1973

Davies, Peter E. US Navy F-4 Phantom II Units of the Vietnam War 1969-1973. Osprey Publishing, UK. 2018. 96 pages. Ill. $23. Peter Davies has written many Osprey books, including quite a few dealing with the F-4 in Vietnam. This new book, no. 125 in Osprey’s Combat Aircraft series, continuing the story from No. 116

American Sea Power in the Old World: The United States Navy in European and Near Easter Waters, 1865 – 1917

American Sea Power in the Old World: The United States Navy in European and Near Eastern Waters, 1865-1917 By William N. Still Jr. Annapolis, MD, Naval Institute Press, (2018). Reviewed by Charles H. Bogart   This book is a paperback reissue of the original edition published in 1980, which has not only withstood the test

Ingram’s Fourth Fleet: U.S. and Royal Navy Operations Against German Runners, Raiders, and Submarines in the South Atlantic in World War II By Cdr. David D. Bruhn, USN (Ret.). Heritage Books, Berwyn Heights, MD, (2017) Reviewed by Charles Bogart   Commander Bruhn has crafted an excellent introductory book about an important but forgotten theater of

BOOK REVIEW – The U.S. Navy: A Concise History

By Craig L. Symonds, Oxford University Press, New York, NY (2016) Reviewed by Jason W. Smith, PhD It is often a pleasure to read short books, and Craig Symonds’ The U.S. Navy: A Concise History does not disappoint. Symonds, professor emeritus at the United States Naval Academy, is an eminent scholar of naval history whose

BOOK REVIEW – Thinking Wisely, Planning Boldly: The Higher Education and Training of Royal Navy Officers, 1919-39

By Joseph Moretz, Helion & Company, West Midlands, UK (2014) Reviewed by CDR Benjamin Armstrong, PhD The years following the Great War have become something of a favorite of modern day military analysts in search of historical analogy. The development of innovative doctrine, the introduction and assimilation of new technologies, and struggles with fluctuating fiscal

BOOK REVIEW – Letters From Your Loving Son: Wilson C. Lineaweaver, His Journey through the CCC and U.S. Navy Until His Death on the USS Bunker Hill in 1945

Edited by Thomas R. Lehman, CreateSpace (2017) Reviewed by Charles H. Bogart Wilson C. Lineaweaver’s life might have been summed up as born 1919 and died 1945, except that his mother saved the over 200 letters he wrote home. These letters, passed down through the family, were recognized by Thomas Lehman, the editor of this

BOOK REVIEW – US Navy Escort Carriers 1942-45

By Mark Stille, New Vanguard Series, Osprey Publishing, New York, NY (2017) Reviewed by Michael F. Solecki There were three major types of aircraft carriers in World War II (WWII). The first, very expensive “fleet” carriers, were large, fast, heavily armored, and armed for self-defense, carried over 80 planes designed with major strike and long-range