Large Scale Warship Models: From Kits to Scratch Building

Reviewed by Jeff Schultz Kerry Jang’s Large Scale Warship Models: From Kits to Scratch Building fills an important gap in the literature meant for the ship modeling enthusiast, whether novice or intermediate.  This short but lavishly illustrated book provides valuable instruction on how to conceptualize, construct, paint and finish large-scale ship models for display and

Glasgow Museums: The Ship Models – A History and Complete Illustrated Catalogue

Reviewed by Ingo Heidbrink Sometimes there are books that feel special from the very first moment you receive them. Glasgow Museums The Ship Models – A History and Complete Illustrated Catalogue is without any doubt such a book. First of all, catalogues of museum collections have become to a certain degree a rare species, and

British Naval Weapons of World War Two: The John Lambert Collection – Volume I: Destroyer Weapons

Reviewed by Charles H. Bogart This book consists of two sections, a 52-page introduction written by Norman Friedman and 173 pages of line drawings executed by the late John Lambert. These line drawings show both the profiles of World War II Royal Navy destroyers and the weapon systems they carried. With the death of John

All of Which I Saw: With The US Marine Corps in Iraq

Reviewed by Major Chris Ketcherside, USMC (Ret.) Lucian Read is a photojournalist who was embedded with the 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit during the fighting for An Najaf and then later with 3rd Bn, 1st Marines during the assault on Fallujah. All of Which I Saw is a selection of photographs and journal entries he made during

The Great Nightfall: How We Win the New Cold War

Reviewed by RADM Edward Masso, USN (Ret.) Ambassador J William Middendorf II has written a clarion call to attention for all policy makers in his recently published book, “The Great Nightfall” How We Win the New Cold War. Drawing from his substantial career in public service where he served as a Naval Officer in World

The Secret Sauce For Organizational Success: Communications and Leadership on the Same Page

Reviewed by LCDR David K. Sturges, USNR (Ret.) “Experience keeps a dear school.”  Retired RADM Tom Jurkowsky’s new book gives fresh and useful meaning to that old saying of Benjamin Franklin.  His “Secret Sauce for Organizational Success.” recounts his 45 years of exceptional communication and public affairs leadership within a rare, three-way panoply of military,

Encyclopedia of Armed Forces Football: The Complete History of the Glory Years

Reviewed by LCDR Brian Hayes, USNR In 2017, New York Times sports reporter Victor Mather wrote an article entitled “The Best College Football Team You’ve Probably Never Heard Of.” He was referring to Iowa Pre-Flight, one of dozens of armed forces football programs that competed against collegiate teams (and each other) during the world wars and

Touring the Antebellum South with an English Opera Company: Anton Reiff’s Riverboat Travel Journal

Reviewed by Charles H. Bogart Anyone who has studied the United States’ Antebellum period has, during the course of one’s reading, encountered snippets or lengthy excerpts from the Diary of Anton Reiff. Until now, if you wanted to read Reiff’s complete diary, you had to travel to Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and make arrangements to visit

The Boats of Cherbourg: The Navy That Stole Its Own Boats and Revolutionized Naval Warfare

Reviewed by Jeff Schultz Abraham Rabinovich’s The Boats of Cherbourg: The Navy That Stole Its Own Boats and Revolutionized Naval Warfare takes the reader on a rollicking ride through an early Cold War techno-thriller which does not disappoint. A mixture of diplomacy, desperation, rank skullduggery, and above all clever statecraft; this timely nonfiction account sheds

Rome Rules the Waves: A Naval Staff Appreciation of Ancient Rome’s Maritime Strategy 300 BCE – 500 CE

Reviewed by Tyler Robinson In the decades since he worked as a consultant at the Historical Evaluation Research Organization under the esteemed military historian and theorist Colonel Trevor Dupuy (author of The Encyclopedia of Military History), James Bloom has contributed hundreds of shorter works to journals, encyclopedias, and books focused on ancient, maritime, and military

Hitler’s Attack U-Boats: The Kreigsmarine’s WW II Submarine Strike Force

Reviewed by Charles C. Kolb, Ph.D. During World War II,  Hamburg, Germany’s second  largest city – an industrial center with oil refineries, extensive shipyards, and U-boat pens — endured  115 British  Royal Air Force strategic bombing raids (1939-1945), one of which in July 1943, code named  Operation Gomorrah, created a huge firestorm  killing an estimated

A Marine Artist’s Portfolio: The Nautical Paintings of Susanne Fournais.

Reviewed by Ingo Heidbrink. While marine painting was a fairly common artistic genre up to the 19th and early 20th century, ships of the second half of the 20th and the early decades of the 21st century only rarely caught the attention of professional artists, and the profession of the marine painter needs to be

Warship Builders: An Industrial History of U.S. Naval Shipbuilding, 1922-1945

Reviewed by Charles C. Kolb, Ph.D. There has been a deluge of new books and recent articles focusing on American wartime shipbuilding, 1939-1945, witness Evan Mawdsley’s The War for the Seas: A Maritime History of World War II (New Haven, CT and London: Yale University Press, 2019) and Jamie McGrath ‘s  “Peacetime Naval Rearmament, 1933-39: