Churchill’s Pirates: The Royal Naval Patrol Service in World War II

Reviewed by Ingo Heidbrink With more than 1500 craft operating during World War II the Royal Naval Patrol Service (RNPS) was a fleet of substantial size, but as these craft were mainly converted trawlers, fuel carriers, and motor launches with some corvettes and sea plane tenders it is also a fleet often overlooked by naval

Expedition Deep Ocean: The First Descent to the Bottom of All Five of the World’s Oceans

Reviewed by John Grady New York Times bestselling author Josh Young’s Expedition Deep Ocean brings to life a detailed portrait of Victor Vescovo. A very rich Texas equity-fund founder and Navy intelligence reservist educated at MIT, Harvard, and Stanford, Vescovo flew fixed-wing and rotary aircraft and climbed the world’s seven highest mountains, but his latest

Pacific Adversaries Volume 3: Imperial Japanese Navy vs. The Allies, New Guinea & the Solomons 1942-1944

Reviewed by LCDR Brian Hayes, USN (Ret.) Michael Claringbould has authored or co-authored more than a dozen works on World War II Pacific aviation, and as the title suggests, he previously produced two similar collections focused on New Guinea and the Solomons. This book is a collection of fifteen accounts of aviation operations in the

Arthur Beaumont: Art of the Sea

Reviewed by Edward Masso, Rear Admiral, US Navy (Ret) The state of California has a rich history in producing and displaying some very special art in their numerous museums placed strategically throughout the state. California boasts brilliant and important museums such as: The Norton Simon Museum, Getty Museum, The Historic Catholic Missions, Presidential Libraries of

Liberty Factory: The Untold Story of Henry Kaiser’s Oregon Shipyards

Reviewed by Charles C. Kolb, PhD Peter J Marsh was born in Greenwich, UK, and combined a career in teaching with time spent boat-building, offshore racing, and voyaging under sail, but a chance visit to the United States convinced him to sell his boat and emigrate. Settling in Portland, Oregon, he returned to a sailing

Crusader: General Don Starry and the Army of his Times

Reviewed by LTC Daniel P. Sukman, USA Establishing himself as a military historian and biographer, author Mike Guardia has published well-known books in military circles, chronicling the leadership of General Hal Moore, the battle of 73 Easting, and the history of combat platforms such as the Mig-25 and the F-15. In his latest book, Crusader:

Narvik: The Struggle of Battle Group Dietl in the Spring of 1940

Reviewed by Tyler Robinson Translator Janice W. Ancker has made Alex Buchner’s 1958 treatise on the 1940 conflict over the Norwegian city of Narvik available in English for the first time as part of the “Die Wehrmacht Im Kampf” book series from the Center for Historical Analysis and Conflict Research (CHACR), the British Army’s own

The Lost Soldier: The Ordeal of a World War II G.I. from the Home Front to the Hürtgen Forest

Reviewed by Dr. Anthony Feagin, U.S. Army (Ret.) From September 1944 until February 1945, the Hürtgen Forest became one of the bloodiest battlegrounds for U.S. troops during World War II (WWII). At varying times, six different U.S. Army divisions, more than 100,000 men, would fight over 80,000 Germans in the Hürtgen’s rugged terrain, which was

Naval Warfare in the English Channel 1939-1945

Reviewed by Charles C. Kolb, PhD Peter Charles Horstead Smith is Professor of Health Policy at the Imperial College Business School and, since 1982, resides in the small Bedfordshire village of Riseley. He was both a book and a magazine editor but has been a full-time historian and author since 1968. Specializing in maritime and

The British Carrier Strike Fleet After 1945

Reviewed by Charles H. Bogart Do not confuse this book with the author’s British Aircraft Carriers: Design, Development & Service Histories. This book concerns itself with the policy decisions that charted the Royal Navy’s carrier strike force decline from being the second largest in the world to non-existent. It is the story of a service

The Expendable: The true story of Patrol Wing 10, PT Squadron 3, and a Navy Corpsman who refused to surrender when the Philippine Islands fell to Japan

Reviewed by David F. Winkler, Ph.D. Earlier this year I had the pleasure of reviewing The Silver Waterfall: A Novel of the Battle of Midway by retired Captain Kevin Miller, I praised the value of well researched historical fiction as an effective means to convey past events to the reader. In The Expendable, author John

Leyte 1944: The Soldiers’ Battle

Reviewed by Dr. Richard H. Gribling Leyte 1944: The Soldiers’ Battle was written by Nathan N. Prefer, a military historian with graduate degrees in military history. His prior books include The Battle for Tinian: Vital Stepping Stone in America’s War Against Japan, Eisenhower’s Thorn on the Rhine: The Battles for the Colmar Pocket, 1944-45 and

Large Scale Warship Models: From Kits to Scratch Building

Reviewed by Jeff Schultz Kerry Jang’s Large Scale Warship Models: From Kits to Scratch Building fills an important gap in the literature meant for the ship modeling enthusiast, whether novice or intermediate.  This short but lavishly illustrated book provides valuable instruction on how to conceptualize, construct, paint and finish large-scale ship models for display and

Glasgow Museums: The Ship Models – A History and Complete Illustrated Catalogue

Reviewed by Ingo Heidbrink Sometimes there are books that feel special from the very first moment you receive them. Glasgow Museums The Ship Models – A History and Complete Illustrated Catalogue is without any doubt such a book. First of all, catalogues of museum collections have become to a certain degree a rare species, and