Ambassador Middendorf Honored at 2014 NHF Annual Membership Meeting

Each year, the Naval Historical Foundation holds a meeting in Washington, DC to meet with our members, volunteers, and friends to discuss our current and future plans.  Nearly one hundred supporters gathered in the Navy Museum last Saturday for a day of celebration, commemoration, and friendship. This is certainly a year of many commemorative celebrations:

So Proudly We Hail: The History of the United States Flag

By Aaron McDougal, 2014 NHF Summer Intern Today marks the annual Flag Day celebration commemorating the adoption of the Star Spangled Banner as the national flag in 1777. The importance of the flag as the symbol of our country cannot be stressed enough. In light of this, it seems appropriate to draw attention to a

A Young Man in a Brave New World: William Speiden Jr. and the Opening of Japan

“This has been an important and great day and on which the Second grand landing of the Americans in Japan took place. I was fortunate enough on the occasion of the First landing to be one of those who landed.” (8 March 1854) David Dixon Porter. David Glasgow Farragut. Ernest King. William Halsey. These names

35 Tweets to Midway: The U.S. Navy’s Greatest Battle in 140 characters or Less

Over the past two weeks, we have live-tweeted the significant events of the Battle of Midway from the perspective of the Imperial Japanese Navy and United States Navy. Our account, NHFTweetsMidway, helped bring the story to live 140 characters at a time. Don’t want to read over 700 tweets for the recap? Here are 35

“The People Who Fought and Won:” Admiral Harvey Captivates Crowd at 72nd Battle of Midway Celebration Dinner

This year marks the 72nd Anniversary of the Battle of Midway, the most decisive battle in the Pacific Theater. During the pivotal day of 4 June 1942, the United States Navy managed to engage an imposing Japanese fleet and inflict crippling losses to their four carriers and surface ships near Midway Atoll. A large crowd of

9 Summertime Things Sailors Also Do

Well – Warm weather and summer are here.  Time to get out the grills and sun tan lotion, because this summer should be a hot one! There are a lot of ways you can go out and have fun this summer. That doesn’t mean our fighting men and women don’t try to have a little

USS Enterprise CVA(N)/BOOK REVIEW – CVN-65: The World’s First Nuclear-Powered Aircraft Carrier

By Dave McKay, Willsonscott Publishing International Inc, Christchurch, New Zealand (2013) Reviewed by Samuel Loring Morison Everyone remembers where he or she was on September 11, 2011. Enterprise was off the coast of Yemen heading south at Flank Speed.  There, the crew learned of the terrorist attack on the twin towers. Enterprise’s Captain slowed the

BOOK REVIEW – U-9: A Damned Un-English Weapon

By Jim Thesing, Merriam Press, Bennington, VT (2013) Reviewed by Charles Bogart The author has crafted a wonderful fictional account of the German U-boat arm during the period between July and August 1914. The climactic moment within the book is the sinking of the three old Royal Navy cruisers, HMS Aboukir, HMS Cressy, and HMS

BOOK REVIEW – Destiny in the Pacific

By John Schork, Jupiter-Pixel Press, Jupiter, FL (2008) Reviewed by Paul W. Murphey, Ph.D., CDR, CHC, USN (Retired) I was utterly surprised by this novel of naval aviation in the Pacific during World War II. It was a radical departure from the way I knew the author to approach any task. His creativity astounded me.

BOOK REVIEW – The Secret War for the Middle East: The Influence of Axis and Allied Intelligence Operations during World War II

By Youssef Aboul-Enein and Basil Aboul-Enein, Naval Institute Pree, Annapolis, MD (2013) Reviewed by Charles C. Kolb, Ph.D. The Secret War for the Middle East: The Influence of Axis and Allied Intelligence Operations during World War II should not be confused with Andrew Rathmell’s Secret War in the Middle East: The Covert Struggle for Syria,

BOOK REVIEW – In Service To Their Country: Christchurch School and the American Uniformed Services

By Captain Alexander “Sandy” G. Monroe, USN (Ret.), Pleasant Living Books, Richmond, VA (2014) Reviewed by John R. Satterfield, DBA This commemorative volume focuses on graduates of a small private school who served in the U.S. armed forces.  Author Alexander Monroe argues that Christchurch School has imbued its students with an outlook that mirrors military

BOOK REVIEW – Behind the Lines: A Critical Survey of Special Operations in World War II

By Michael F. Dilley, Casemate, Philadelphia, PA and Oxford, England (2013) Reviewed by Stephen K. Stein, Ph.D. Since the 9/11 attacks, U.S. Special Forces have received a growing amount of media attention. Numerous books describe and analyze their recent operations. Michael F. Dilley, a writer and editor for Behind the Lines magazine, returns to the modern

BOOK REVIEW – Billy Mitchell’s War with the Navy: The Interwar Rivalry Over Air Power

By Thomas Wildenberg, Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, MD (2013) Reviewed by Captain J. F. “Bookie” Boland, U.S. Navy (Retired) Colonel Billy Mitchell, an iconic and controversial figure in United States aviation history, is the subject of an important new book by independent historian Thomas Wildenberg. Although Mitchell’s life and military service is examined in innumerable

BOOK REVIEW – 21st Century Mahan: Sound Military Conclusions for a Modern Era

By Benjamin F. Armstrong, Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, MD (2013) Reviewed by Capt. Scott Mobley, USN (Ret.) Despite Alfred Thayer Mahan‘s tremendous influence upon naval policy, national security affairs, and international politics during the early 20th century, many people today regard his ideas as curious artifacts of a bygone era.  In his time, Mahan achieved

BOOK REVIEW – One Magnificent Bastard: BGEN William Weise, USMC (Ret.)

By Mark Huffman, RH Rositzke & Associates, LLC, Washington, DC (2013) Reviewed by John R. Satterfield, DBA This brief volume tells the story of a distinguished Marine Corps veteran, BGen. William B. Weise, whose career spanned 1952 to 1982 and included service in Korea and Vietnam. BGen. Weise served with more than six months of