French Armoured Cruisers 1887-1932

Review by Mr. Charles Bogart Between 1887 and 1910, France built 26 armoured cruisers. These ships were built as single units or as part of a class of ships that numbered between two and five units. Despite the homely looks of French warships during this period, French naval architectural design, at this time, was in

The Boundless Sea: A Human History of the Oceans

Review by Mr. John Grady Make no mistake about David Abulafia’s The Boundless Sea, it is a monumental work, tackling the largest subject on the planet, the seas, and having as an overlay of that story the planet’s most perplexing creature — humans. At almost 1,000 pages of text, The Boundless Sea is not a

USS Olympia

By John Brady, President, Board of Directors, Flagship Olympia Foundation The USS Olympia, the former Navy cruiser who brought World War I Unknown Soldier home from Europe, is celebrating her 125th birthday this year. To mark the momentous milestone, we’re sharing stories about her crew. These men include the African American cabin stewards and mess attendants who

Erebus: One Ship, Two Epic Voyages, and the Greatest Naval Mystery of All Time

History is full of mysteries and the fate of HMS Erebus and her sister ship HMS Terror remained among these mysteries until only a few years ago.  With the discovery of the ships remains, Michael Palin, tells the biography of the Terror from her success in the Antarctic to her fate in the Canadian Arctic

Reflection on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Master Chief Rusty Perry, USN (Ret.) was the senior enlisted Sailor for Navy Medicine and Education Training Command, the Navy Medicine’s formal enlisted and officer education and training programs.Reflection reprinted from:  navymedicine.navylive.dodlive.mil/archives/4056 Shipmates, One of the pioneering minds of this past century penned those words nearly five decades ago, and while appropriate for that time

Back to Basics

Today, all newly enlisted Sailors are trained at one location – Recruit Training Command, Great Lakes, just outside of Chicago, Illinois. This was not always the case, however, despite the occasional, historically inaccurate reference indicating otherwise. See for example a recent Naval Postgraduate School thesis which begins by stating that “since July 1, 1911, all incoming

Russian Battleships and Cruisers of the Russo-Japanese War

Mark Lardas’s Russian Battleships and Cruisers of the Russo-Japanese War (New Vanguard #275) delves into the little discussed Russo-Japanese War. In particular, the Imperial Russian capital ships that fought in the losing effort against an unexpectedly tough opponent in the first defeat of a European power by an Asian foe, with strong repercussions for all

Polaris: The Chief Scientist’s Recollection of the American North Pole Expedition

During the second half of the 19th century the North Pole became the ultimate goal of polar research and various nations stepped up to organize expeditions to reach 90-degree North. After expeditions like the First and Second German North Polar Expedition failed to reach this goal, it was the US to give it another try.

Crusoe, Castaways and Shipwrecks in the Perilous Age of Sail

To celebrate the 300th anniversary of the publication of Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe, Mike Rendell’s monograph explains the influences that inspired Defoe’s novel, as well as the hazards that the early European seafaring community encountered while sailing the seas.  The author looks into the real-life stories and adventures of men and women who had

The Russian Destroyer Spravedlivyy 1956

The Russian Destroyer Spravedlivyy 1956 [Super Drawings in 3D Series] by Oleg Pomoshnikov and Jan Radziemski provides a stunningly detailed look at the 1950s-era warship Spravedlivyy, later the Polish destroyer Warszawa. This series by Kagero is a treat to readers, regardless of which ship profile they purchase. Many exist, ranging from the 1940 Japanese battleship

Churchill’s Thin Grey Line: British Merchant Ships at War 1939-1945

While Edwards’ new book might be seen as just another book on the history of the naval war during World War II it provides valuable insights into a particular aspect of this war that is well known by specialists but nevertheless often overlooked or mentioned only in a brief paragraph: the activities of the British

Heroes of Coastal Command: The RAF’s Maritime War 1939-1945

During the Interwar Years, the leaders of the Royal Air Force preached that the next war would be a short war. The war would be won by bombers which, in a matter of days, would inflict so much damage on the enemy’s urban centers that the civilian outcry would force the country’s leaders to surrender.

The New Battle for the Atlantic

In this fast paced and well researched volume, the author assesses the challenges arising from a revanchist Russia following the annexation of the Crimea by Russia in 2014. It examines the causes and possible course of what he sees as the “fourth battle of the Atlantic”. The United States and their allies, including NATO, are

Uncommon Valour: The Story of the Victoria Cross

The Crimean War Battle of Inkerman, fought November 5, 1854, took place in such foggy obscurity that it was won by the initiative of soldiers and noncoms in relatively small units, and came to be called “The Soldiers’ Battle.” But while officers could be (and were) rewarded by field promotions and knightly orders, no such