Conquering the Ocean: The Roman Invasion of Britain

Reviewed by Capt. Richard Dick, USN (Ret.)  Dr. Richard Hingley’s new book provides a fresh assessment of the Roman conquest of Britain from Julius Caesar’s first raid in 55 B.C. through the building of Hadrian’s Wall (roughly along the current border between England and Scotland) to about 130 A.D. Hingley also adds a higher-level overview

We Are Not Hearing About Any Fiftieth Anniversary IncSea Celebrations – and Why That May Not be a Bad Thing

By David F. Winkler, Ph.D. Staff Historian  Ten years ago, delegations from the U.S. and Russian Federations met at the Naval Observatory to commemorate the 40th anniversary of the signing of the Incidents at Sea Agreement (IncSea) on May 25, 1972, as part of the Nixon- Brezhnev Summit held in Moscow. After a historical overview

Admiral Hyman Rickover: Engineer of Power

Reviewed by Dr. Ernie Marshall The author is an award-winning freelance journalist and independent author/historian whose previous books include: The Millionaire’s Unit: The Aristocrat Flyboys Who Fought the Great War and Invented American Air Power; 1941: Fighting the Shadow War; and The Bonfire: The Siege and Burning of Atlanta. With half a score of books

Dreadnoughts and Super-Dreadnoughts

Reviewed by Ed Calouro   Battleship buffs and authorities on capital ships are familiar with the dictum that once HMS Dreadnought was commissioned in 1906, all existing battleships thereby became obsolete. Indeed, all-big-gun battleships from 1906 forward were considered dreadnoughts or, subsequently, super-dreadnoughts. Capital ships built before 1906 with a mixed or intermediate main armament, were

50 Years Ago: Easter Offensive, South Vietnam 1972 — Recollections of the Role of USS Davidson (DE-1045)

By F.H. McCullough, III INTRODUCTION Fifty-years ago, in the Gulf of Tonkin, during the evening of May 8, 1972, offshore North Vietnam, a U.S. Navy SH-3 Sea King helicopter was making its approach to the U.S. Navy’s guided missile light cruiser USS Providence (CLG 6), flagship of Rear Adm. Rembrandt C. Robinson, USN, the Commander

First Strike, Revisited: Elder Voices From the Doolittle Raid

By Kyle Nappi By April 18, 1942, the United States and its allies had suffered repeated setbacks in the war against Imperial Japan, to include the attack on Pearl Harbor, the capture of Wake Island, and the fall of Hong Kong and Singapore. Just nine days earlier, on April 9, the half-starving ammunition-depleted Bataan Peninsula

Hitler’s Navy: The Kriegsmarine in World War II

Reviewed by CAPT Chuck Good, USN (Ret) Broad in scope and rich in detail, Hitler’s Navy is a comprehensive overview of the ships, organization, and sailors of the Kriegsmarine. As befits Osprey’s core competency in producing monographs of famous ships and classes, the work is lavishly illustrated and full of technical detail. For those seeking

Eyes of the Fleet over Vietnam: RF-8 Crusader Combat Photo Reconnaissance Missions

Reviewed by ISCM (AW) David Mattingly, USN Ret.  A mix of airframes; fighters, light attack planes, and helicopters all made up the carrier air wings on Yankee Station during the Vietnam War. Most notably, the RF-8 Crusader piloted by Navy and Marine Corps aviators flew over enemy territory as the “eyes of the fleet.” Kenneth