Bats Against the Axis PART II: King McClure and His Loyal Subjects

Baseball in Norfolk radically changed the lives of the countless sailors stationed there during World War II. As a means of diversion, sailors at NTS Norfolk created their own private baseball utopia amidst the horrors of war waiting for them in the European and Pacific Theaters. Part two of the four part series. READ PART

Bats Against the Axis: Diversion, Community, and Heritage at the 1943 Navy World Series (PART I)

A Four-Part Blog Series By Matthew T. Eng In the summer of 1943, the best baseball in the United States was played in Norfolk, VA. Unfortunately, you couldn’t just buy any ticket to see diamond stars like Fred Hutchinson, Dom DiMaggio, and Phil Rizzuto play that year – you had to enlist. This four part

The Anchored Roots of Naval History: American Export Explores Storied Family Past at Navy Department Library

By Matthew T. Eng “Every family has a history. Every family has a story. This helps explain why you are the way you are.” It’s fall here in Washington, D.C. The hot summer heat and brown grass are finally giving way to cooler temperatures and changing leaves. For some, this pleasant change in weather can

BOOK REVIEW – Q Ship VS U-Boat: 1914-18

By David Greentree, Osprey Publishing, New York, NY (2014) Reviewed by Sam Craghead With its dependency on merchant ship deliveries, the success of German U-Boats caused grave danger to Great Britain’s lifeline of food and supplies. Created as a countermeasure to the German submarines during World War I, service on a Q Ship became one of

BOOK REVIEW – Into the Dark Water: The Story of the Officers of PT 109

By John J. Domagalski, Casemate Publishers, Havertown, PA 2014 Reviewed by: Tim McGrath Mention PT 109 to the “Greatest Generation” and “Baby Boomers” and you will conjure up a slew of memories: the tie-clips worn by men working for John F. Kennedy in the White House, the bestselling book by Robert J. Donovan, and the

Going Ashore: Naval Operations in Casco Bay During World War II (Part IV)

By George Stewart (This is the fourth and final installment in a series of blog posts covering the various operations conducted in Maine during WWII. Click to read Parts I, II, and III of George Stewart’s blog series about Casco Bay during WWII. To read all other post by George, go HERE.)  PART IV This post

BOOK REVIEW – South Pacific Cauldron: World War II’s Great Forgotten Battlegrounds

By Alan Rems, Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, MD (2014) Reviewed by John R. Satterfield, DBA Although an amateur historian, author Rems has produced a very professional volume.  His book is the only recent one-volume account of World War II’s Southwest Pacific Theater that treats its numerous campaigns, both comprehensively and chronologically. This is valuable for

Victor Delano, Naval Hero and Friend of NHF, Passes

The Naval Historical Foundation lost a good friend and dedicated member last week. Victor Delano, U.S. Navy Captain (retired) and Pearl Harbor survivor, died on Monday, August 25th, at Casey House in Rockville, Maryland. Delano was 94 years old. Delano was born into a family legacy of Navy Veterans. His father, Captain Harvey Delano, was

Men and Women of Steel: A Labor Day Tribute to Navy Civilians in Times of Peace and War (Photo Essay)

It is incredibly difficult to go “full speed ahead” without a ship to sail. If it was not for the skilled hands that crafted the 8-inch barrels, Captain Charles Gridley could not fire Olympia’s guns at Manila Bay. Do sailors alone win the great victories and triumphs of our naval history? Without the help of

BOOK REVIEW – America’s First Frogman: The Draper Kauffman Story

By Elizabeth Kauffman Bush, Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, MD (2004) Reviewed by Stephen Phillips There is a World War II American serviceman who fits the description of being the “right man at the right time.” Although he wanted to serve in the U.S. Navy, he was denied a commission in 1933 due to poor eyesight.

Fresh Water Wash-Down: When Foul Weather Impacted Naval History

Most people in the United States (especially the East Coast) know that the Atlantic Hurricane Season lasts from the beginning of June until the end of November. During those six months, we anxiously watch our television screens as each successive storm passes to the United States, some reaching from the African coast to the reaches

BOOK REVIEW – The Port Chicago 50: Disaster, Mutiny, and the Fight for Civil Rights

By Steve Sheinkin, Roaring Book Press, New York, NY (2014) Review by: Aldona Sendzikas, Ph.D. How do you explain racism to teenagers—specifically, the existence of institutionalized racism and segregation in the U.S. Navy during most of its history? This is author Steve Sheinkin’s challenge in this book for young adults about the massive explosion that

Going Ashore: Naval Operations in Casco Bay During World War II (Part II)

By George Stewart (This is the second of a series of blog posts that discuss the role that Casco Bay played during the Second World War. This is Part I of the series. “Going Ashore” are the collected posts from George Stewart, retired Navy Captain and NHF blog volunteer. Read the first post HERE). By 1942, the

Going Ashore: Naval Operations in Casco Bay During World War II (Part I)

By George Stewart (This is the first of a series of blog posts that discuss the role that Casco Bay played during the Second World War. This is Part I of the series. “Going Ashore” are the collected posts from George Stewart, retired Navy Captain and NHF blog volunteer). This series of blog posts will provide