BOOK REVIEW – America’s Sailors in the Great War: Seas, Skies, and Submarines

By Lisle A. Rose, University of Missouri Press, Columbia, MO (2016) Reviewed by Capt. Andrew C. A. Jampoler, USN (Ret.) Dr. Lisle Rose has taken on a challenge in this, his seventh book for the U. of M. Press. This history of U.S. Navy operations during World War I rightly begins by explaining that the

BOOK REVIEW – The Battle of Jutland

By Geoffrey Bennett (originally published B.T. Batsford Ltd., London, UK 1964), Pan & Sword Books Ltd. Barnsley, UK (2015) Reviewed by Tim McGrath Few historians, on land or sea, can match the depth and breadth of the work of Captain Geoffrey Bennett. As a Royal Navy officer who served Great Britain in war and peacetime,

The First U.S. Naval Electric Propulsion Plant

By Captain George Stewart, USN (Ret.) This post provides a basic description of the turboelectric propulsion plant aboard the collier USS Jupiter (AC 3) in its original configuration. Much of this information was obtained from the textbook Practical Marine Engineering (1917) by Captain C.W. Dyson, USN. Additional information was obtained from an article in the

FDR’s Vision Fulfilled: A Visit to the National Museum of the Royal Navy

By David F. Winkler As the United States fought a two ocean war during World War II, the commander-in-chief had a post-war vision of a naval heritage complex with representative ships of the late 18th century, the Civil War era, the new Steel Navy, and World War I astride of an interpretive naval museum. To

U.S. Naval Leadership in World War I: Discussed and Debated at Greenwich

By David F. Winkler Historian Naval Historical Foundation With the Battle of Jutland centennial in our recent wake, the British Commission for Naval History, The British Commission for Maritime History, and The National Maritime Museum hosted a conference titled “The First World War at Sea, 1914-19” on June 3-4, 2016, at the National Maritime Museum

BOOK REVIEW – From Imperial Splendor to Internment

By Nicolas Wolz, Seaforth Publishing, Barnsley, England (2015) Reviewed by Winn Price The students of seapower who follows the Naval Historical Foundation’s Naval History Book Reviews have probably read several books about the First World War at sea. There are, after all, hundreds of titles, ranging from the memoirs of the participants published in the

BOOK REVIEW – Before Jutland: The Naval War in Northern European Waters, August 1914—February 1915

By James Goldrick, Naval Institute Press, Annapolis MD (2015) Reviewed by Phillip G. Pattee. Ph.D. James Goldrick, the author of several books and articles on topics of naval and defense interest, including naval history, is a retired Rear Admiral in the Royal Australian Navy. In 1984, as a Lieutenant, Goldrick published his first book, The

BOOK REVIEW – The Bridge to Airpower: Logistics Support for Royal Flying Corps Operations on the Western Front, 1914-18

By Peter Dye, Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, MD (2015) Reviewed Larry A. Grant “In war we must expect a casualty list of 100% every three months in men and material and must be prepared to replace all our pilots, observers and machines at this rate….” Brig. Gen. Robert Brooke-Popham “Amateurs talk about tactics, but professionals

BOOK REVIEW – Striking the Hornet’s Nest: Naval Aviation and the Beginnings of Strategic Bombing in World War I

By Geoffrey L. Rossano and Thomas Wildenberg, Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, MD (2015) Reviewed by David F. Winkler, Ph.D. With the centennial of America’s entry into World War I just over a year away, the Naval Institute Press could not have timed the publication of this book any better. It’s understood that World War I

BOOK REVIEW – The Zeebrugge and Ostend Raids, 1918

By Deborah Lake, Pen and Sword Military, Barnsley, UK (2015) Reviewed by Joseph Moretz, Ph.D. In a struggle of global proportions, minor acts at times achieve a resonance not measured by the ledger of gains and losses or the scale of their actual decisiveness. The Arab Revolt during the First World War may be cited

Correspondence and Records of Early Navy Submariner Catalogued

In 2016, the Naval Historical Foundation will celebrate its 90th year as a non-profit institution. As a testament to our Foundation’s principle to preserve, educate, and commemorate, we want to highlight stories where we are actively seeking out ways to keep naval history alive for generations to come. As the United States begins to commemorate

BOOK REVIEW – Gallipoli

By Jenny Macleod, Oxford University Press, Oxford: England (2015) Reviewed by Joseph Moretz, Ph.D. The campaign fought on the Gallipoli peninsula in 1915 has not suffered from a want of telling. With the centenary of its occurrence now at hand, yet another entry faces the immediate hurdle of offering perspective where others have not. This

BOOK REVIEW – Warships of the Great War Era: A History in Ship Models

David Hobbs, Seaforth Publishing, Barnsly, England (2014) Reviewed by Michael Wynd Esteemed naval historian David Hobbs has authored a very valuable publication on the warships of the First World War using ship models from the collection of the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich. This is part of a series of publications using ship models to

BOOK REVIEW – 21st Century Ellis

Edited By B.A. Friedman, Naval Institute Press. Annapolis, MD (2015) Reviewed by Nathan Albright As part of the Naval Institute Press’ 21st Century series on notable naval thinkers, this book provides much of the body of work written by Marine Lieutenant Colonel “Pete” Ellis. Shortly after the Spanish-American War, Ellis enlisted with the Marines, and