Bats Against the Axis PART III: The Beginning of a Rivalry

A Four-Part Blog Series By Matthew T. Eng  Baseball in Norfolk radically changed the lives of the countless sailors stationed there during World War II. As a means of diversion, sailors at NTS Norfolk created their own private baseball utopia amidst the horrors of war waiting for them in the European and Pacific Theaters. Part

The New Naval History in the Digital Frontier

In September 2013, I presented a paper at the 2013 McMullen Naval History Symposium. My paper analyzed the Confederate Navy in public memory and commemoration. The panel my colleagues and I submitted to the conference discussed the various roles Confederate naval forces played during the American Civil War. Unlike my fellow panelists, the majority of

The Hanoi Hilton and Racial Adversity: Junior Naval Historians Shine at National History Day

Thousands of excited and energetic students from around the country packed into the University of Maryland’s Comcast Center last Thursday to participate in the awards ceremony for National History Day. The event is the culmination of a busy week for these young scholars. Students in middle and high school showcase their history projects, ranging from

In Death Unafraid: History, Memory, and the USS Maine (Part II)

In Death Unafraid is a two part blog miniseries chronicling the history and memory of the USS Maine from 1898 to present.  Read PART I here.    Part II: Worse Than Hell When riots broke out in Havana at the beginning of 1898, the McKinley government sent the battleship Maine there to protect American interests

In Death Unafraid: History, Memory, and the USS Maine (Part I)

In Death Unafraid is a two part blog miniseries chronicling the history and memory of the USS Maine from 1898 to present.   Newspaper Reaction to the Sinking of the Maine  Part I: Garish Marble The week before I started my job at the Naval Historical Foundation, my wife and I took a trip to

World War Two and the Vitamin Sea: Navy Propaganda Posters of the Florida Citrus Commission

FIGHT Colds! FIGHT Fatigue! FIGHT Weakness! FIGHT Infection! FIGHT Absenteeism! One of the more fascinating aspects of the Second World War was the use of propaganda on home front society.  In Propaganda, Edward Barnays notes the limited use of the practice prior to the First World War.  By the time hostilities erupted in 1914, however,

Vice Admiral Michelle Howard and the Wind of Change for Military Women

  “Men have the luxury of being average.  When you walk in as a woman, that assumption does not come with you.” –  Michelle Howard, Commander, USS Rushmore, Time Magazine, 2000.   This blog discusses American naval history. History, by definition, is a study of the past. It is a very rare and special treat

Turkey, Giblet Gravy, and….Cigarettes? Former NHHC Staffer Reveals Holiday Menu Collection

If you follow any organization that studies naval history, chances are you have recently seen several ship and shore holiday menus posted or shared on their respective social media sites.   Institutions like the Naval History and Heritage Command, Puget Sound Naval Museum, Hampton Roads Naval Museum, and Battleship Cove are showcasing their unique collections of