BOOK REVIEW – Poseidon and the PC – The Letters of Lt. Paul W. Neidhardt

Edited by Gary W. Neidhardt. AuthorHouse, Bloomington, IN, (2013) Reviewed by Charles Bogart Editor Gary Neidhardt transcribed and annotated 115 letters that his father, Lt. Paul W. Neidhardt, wrote to his wife, Phyllis, between September 1943 and November 1945. Neidhardt, commissioned as an Ensign in the U.S. Navy in July 1942, went on to serve

BOOK REVIEW – Pushing The Limits – The Remarkable Life and Times of Vice Adm. Allan Rockwell McCann, USN

By Carl LaVO, Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, MD, (2013) Reviewed by Charles H. Bogart Those who study the United States Navy submarine service have encountered in their readings a mention of the McCann Submarine Rescue Chamber. This book is a biography of Vice Admiral McCann, who played a major role in shaping the United States’

BOOK REVIEW – In the Trough: Three Years on Ocean Station

By Thomas F. Jaras, iUniverse, (2013). Reviewed by Thomas P. Ostrom This book drew my attention because of my time in the U.S. Coast Guard Reserve in the 1960s. Between 1940 and 1980, the USCG had Ocean Station vessels in the Atlantic and Pacific performing a variety of national defense initiatives. These included search and

In Death Unafraid: History, Memory, and the USS Maine (Part I)

In Death Unafraid is a two part blog miniseries chronicling the history and memory of the USS Maine from 1898 to present.   Newspaper Reaction to the Sinking of the Maine  Part I: Garish Marble The week before I started my job at the Naval Historical Foundation, my wife and I took a trip to

Norman’s Corner: My Adopted Brother

By Norman Polmar (Editor’s note: This is the 24th in a series of blogs by Norman Polmar—author, analyst, and consultant specializing in the naval, aviation, and intelligence fields. Follow the full series here.) The U.S. nuclear attack submarine Thresher sank during sea trials off the New England coast on 10 April 1963, with the loss

Shipping Out: My Experiences on a Commercial Tanker (Part II)

This is the second of three articles that describe my experiences while serving as an engineer aboard commercial tankers in 1961. These articles provide a perspective on the different engineering practices between the Navy and Merchant Marine in the post-World War II era.  (READ THE FIRST ARTICLE HERE)   I just completed a stint of

Shipping out: My Experiences on a Commercial Tanker (PART I)

By Captain George Stewart, USN (Retired) This is the first of three articles that describe my experiences while serving as an engineer aboard commercial tankers in 1961.  These articles provide perspective on the different engineering practices between the Navy and Merchant Marine in the post World War II-era. As will become apparent, there were some

BOOK REVIEW – Naval Air: Celebrating A Century of Naval Flying

By Philip Kaplan, Pen & Sword Books, Ltd, South Yorkshire, UK, (2013) Reviewed by Jan Churchill Eminent aviation historian Philip Kaplan, an American living in Cheltenham, England, wrote a compelling book that explores the most significant aspects in the development of naval aviation over the past century. When air power became a major factor during

Norman’s Corner: A Real Curmudgeon

By Norman Polmar (Editor’s note: This is the eighteenth in a series of blogs by Norman Polmar—author, analyst, and consultant specializing in the naval, aviation, and intelligence fields. Follow the full series here.) We often tend to use terms and words to describe people that, when we learn the true meaning of the word, often