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BOOK REVIEW – Striking the Hornet’s Nest: Naval Aviation and the Beginnings of Strategic Bombing in World War I

By Geoffrey L. Rossano and Thomas Wildenberg, Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, MD (2015) Reviewed by David F. Winkler, Ph.D. With the centennial of America’s entry into World War I just over a year away, the Naval Institute Press could not have timed the publication of this book any better. It’s understood that World War I

BOOK REVIEW – Harnessing the Sky: Frederick “Trap” Trapnell, the U.S. Navy’s Aviation Pioneer, 1923-1952

By Frederick M. Trapnell Jr. and Dana Trapnell Tibbits, Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, MD (2015) Reviewed by Nathan D. Wells Individuals who were “present at the creation” of seminal events or organizations tend to be popular subjects for biographies, especially if their influence was of great strategic importance. When those individuals are not well-known despite

BOOK REVIEW – Surprised at Being Alive: An Accidental Helicopter Pilot in Vietnam and Beyond

By Robert E. Curtis, Casemate Publishers, (2014) Reviewed by Thomas Ostrom In his 24 years in the service, Major Robert F. Curtis flew helicopters for the U.S. Army, Marine Corps, and Kentucky National Guard. Curtis flew in the United States, Britain (with the Royal Navy), Norway, and Vietnam from shore bases and the rolling decks

BOOK REVIEW – The Supercarriers: The Forrestal and Kitty Hawk Classes

By Andrew Faltum, Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, MD (2014) Reviewed by Mark Lardas They were the first aircraft carriers designed from the keel up to operate jet aircraft. When they appeared, they were so big a jump over their World War II predecessors; they were considered not just aircraft carriers, but rather supercarriers. And now

BOOK REVIEW – Call Me Gus – The Story of Admiral George E. R. Kinnear II, USN (Ret)

By Admiral Kinnear as told to James Carter, Dog Ear Publishing, Indianapolis, IN (2014) Reviewed by Charles Bogart The heart of this autographical book centers around four topics the Admiral feels are important for success: have a vision of what you want to achieve, take advantage of continuing education opportunities, spend time developing personal networks,

BOOK REVIEW – Naval Air Station Patuxent River

By Mark A. Chambers, Arcadia Publishing, Charleston, SC (2014) Reviewed by Richard P. Hallion, Ph.D. This pictorial history is a useful and appealing introduction to what naval aviators—specifically, test pilots, flight test engineers, test crews, and technical support staff—have accomplished over the last seventy years at one of the world’s finest and most historic flight

BOOK REVIEW – RAVEN ONE

By Captain Kevin P. Miller, U.S. Navy (Retired), Pelican Press, Pensacola, FL (2014) Reviewed by Jan Churchill The author, a 24-year veteran of the U.S. Navy, is a former tactical naval aviator who flew the A-7E Corsair II and FA-18C Hornet operationally, logging over 1,000 carrier-arrested landings. Miller commanded a carrier-based strike-fighter squadron. Raven One

BOOK REVIEW – Images of Aviation: Naval Air Station Atlantic City

By Richard V. Porcelli, Arcadia Publishing, Charleston, South Carolina, (2012) Reviewed by John Galluzzo Authors choosing to work with Arcadia Publishing set themselves up with a challenge. With strict word counts accompanying each image size (small and large portraits and landscapes, and double page spreads), brevity becomes more than an issue, it becomes a ritual.

BOOK REVIEW – Destiny in the Pacific

By John Schork, Jupiter-Pixel Press, Jupiter, FL (2008) Reviewed by Paul W. Murphey, Ph.D., CDR, CHC, USN (Retired) I was utterly surprised by this novel of naval aviation in the Pacific during World War II. It was a radical departure from the way I knew the author to approach any task. His creativity astounded me.

World War I-Era Naval Aviation Material donated to National Naval Aviation Museum

The Naval Historical Foundation recently received some very interesting pieces of naval aviation memorabilia from the descendants of Ensign Dudley C. Lunt, USNRF.  Lunt enlisted in the Naval Reserve in March 1918 and was called into active service shortly thereafter.  He found himself at a ground school for aviation cadets at the Massachusetts Institute of

New Aircraft Additions to the Cold War Gallery

The first thing visitors see when they walk through the doors of the Navy Museum’s Cold War Gallery is the massive Trident I C-4 Missile.  Looking left, an impressive glass case sits right next to the Ready Room Theater.  The case houses a wide array of 1:48 scale models of aircraft developed and flown during

BOOK REVIEW – Naval Air: Celebrating A Century of Naval Flying

By Philip Kaplan, Pen & Sword Books, Ltd, South Yorkshire, UK, (2013) Reviewed by Jan Churchill Eminent aviation historian Philip Kaplan, an American living in Cheltenham, England, wrote a compelling book that explores the most significant aspects in the development of naval aviation over the past century. When air power became a major factor during

BOOK REVIEW – Hero of the Angry Sky: The World War I Diary and Letters of David S. Ingalls, America’s First Naval Ace

Edited by Geoffrey L. Rossano, Ohio University Press, Athens, OH, (2013). Reviewed by Mitchell Yockelson, Ph.D. Hero of the Angry Sky is the unique story of World War I Navy flying ace Lt. David S. Ingalls. Editor Geoffrey L. Rossano dug deep into a number of American and British archival collections and uncovered a wealth