BOOK REVIEW – Fire in My Eyes: An American Warrior’s Journey from Being Blinded on the Battlefield to Gold Medal Victory

By Brad Snyder and Tom Sileo, Da Capo Press, Cambridge, MA (forthcoming 2016)  Reviewed by Stephen Phillips  Brad Snyder felt a call to service, choosing a path through the U.S. Naval Academy to leadership as a U.S. Navy Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Officer. EOD Technicians, our military’s bomb squad,  serve in the vanguard of modern

BOOK REVIEW – The U.S. Naval Institute on The U.S. Naval Academy: The History

Edited by Thomas J. Cutler, Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, MD (2015) Reviewed by Michael F. Solecki In 1839, the federal government established the first formal non-private naval school in Philadelphia called the “Naval Asylum,” a somewhat daunting name by today’s grammatical vernacular. The school, the actual forerunner of the U.S. Naval Academy, was an academic

Death and Rebirth: 2015 McMullen Naval History Symposium Recap

  By Matthew T. Eng In his introduction to the 1995 essay collection Doing Naval History, Naval War College Professor Dr. John B. Hattendorf discussed the (then) current state of naval history. Using information gathered at the 1993 Yale-Naval War College conference, Dr. Hattendorf noted the dangers of moving forward in the field: “While there

The Maryland 800 and the Call to Arms in 1917

“It is a real war call- the urgency is evident [. . .] as an assurance of appreciation of our community of their patriotism in this emergency we must engrave their names in a permanent record.” (The Baltimore Sun, 3 April 1917) Several weeks ago, the Foundation received an email from a woman seeking out

BOOK REVIEW – SUBIC: A Sailor’s Memoir

By Barbara Perkins-Brown, Self Published Reviewed By Lori Bogle. Ph.D. Barbara Perkins-Brown’s Subic: A Sailor’s Memoir is a tribute to her father Bobby Earl Perkins.  Perkins joined the Navy in the late 1960s to escape the segregated South only to become a victim of racial discrimination at Subic Bay Naval Base, Philippines.  Written in the first person

2014 Captain Edward L. Beach, Jr. Naval History Award Announced

On a day when the Blue Angels returned to the Naval Academy to entertain the crowds for the first time in several years, the warm up event was the annual Division of Humanities and Social Sciences Awards Ceremony in the hallowed Memorial Hall of the Academy’s Bancroft Hall. This year’s winner of the Naval Historical

BOOK REVIEW: The Recipient’s Son: A Novel of Honor

By Stephen Phillips, Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, MD, (2012). Reviewed by LTJG J. Scott Shaffer, USN Developing future naval officers morally, mentally, and physically is not an easy task.  Midshipmen come from all fifty states with various backgrounds, beliefs, and personalities.  By the time they take their oath, they must be ready to lead.  Stephen