BOOK REVIEW – Medieval Maritime Warfare

By Charles D.  Stanton, Pen & Sword Maritime, Barnsley, UK (2015) Reviewed by Nathan Albright As a former US naval officer and airline pilot whose research has been in medieval Mediterranean history, Charles Stanton is well equipped to undertake the task of writing a comprehensive introduction to medieval naval warfare. With several well-received articles in

BOOK REVIEW – The Ingenious Life of Melbourne Smith – One Man’s Revival of Historic Sailing Vessels

By Paul Wood, Woods Maritime, Kamuela, HI (2015) Reviewed by Charles Bogart Paul Wood has written an excellent biographical account of naval architect Melbourne Smith who is the President of the International Historical Watercraft Society, and serves as Advisory Board Chairman for the National Maritime Historical Society and trustee of the American Ship Trust. Born

BOOK REVIEW – With Sails Whitening Every Sea

By Brian Rouleau Cornell University Press, Ithaca, NY (2014)  Reviewed by Andrew C. A. Jampoler  In early June 1867 Samuel Clemens, together with some sixty-five other passengers, sailed in SS Quaker City (late USS Quaker City, during 1861-65 the paddle wheel steamer had participated in the Union’s blockade of the Confederacy) from New York City. 

AWARD ANNOUNCEMENT – Henry N. Barkhausen Award

The Henry N. Barkhausen Award For Original Research in Great Lakes Maritime History For consideration in the current calendar year, entries for must be postmarked no later than May 15 Guidelines for Entrants Since 2001, the Association for Great Lakes Maritime History has sponsored the Henry N. Barkhausen Award program to recognize and encourage new

Why Not Comic-Con? 10th Maritime Heritage Conference Draws the Best and Brightest in Maritime/Naval History

By Matthew Eng I thought my experience at this year’s 10th Maritime Heritage Conference would be like every other history conference. Most conferences roll by mechanically on autopilot. A variety of presentations and panels on historical subjects form the crux of discussion. Hotel food is eaten. Conversations are made. Cards are exchanged. Hands are shaken.

BOOK REVIEW – Legends in Sail

By Olaf T. Engvig, Themo Publishing, Los Angeles, CA (2013) Reviewed by Mark Lardas Norway has a long maritime tradition. While it is still among the world’s major shipping nations, it used sailing vessels much later than the rest of the world. Regardless, much of its recent maritime heritage is largely unknown outside Norway. Part

BOOK REVIEW – Four Years Before the Mast: A History of New York’s Maritime College

By Joseph A. Williams, Fort Schuyler Press, Bronx, NY (2013) Reviewed by Suzanne Geissler,Suzanne Geissle Ph.D. The State University of New York Maritime College is the oldest maritime college in the United States.  A history of this college is long overdue, and Joseph A. Williams has now provided an excellent one.  Williams is a librarian

BOOK REVIEW – The Sea and Civilization: A Maritime History of the World

By Lincoln Paine, Alfred A. Knopf, New York, NY (2013) Reviewed by Sam Craghead This book could easily be titled, “The Greatest Sea Story Ever Told.”  The subtitle proffers the scope of the work, which Lincoln Paine delivers in grand style.  With 599 pages of text, 48 pages of bibliography, 17 maps, 26 pages of

Shipping Out: My Experiences on a Commercial Tanker (Part II)

This is the second of three articles that describe my experiences while serving as an engineer aboard commercial tankers in 1961. These articles provide a perspective on the different engineering practices between the Navy and Merchant Marine in the post-World War II era.  (READ THE FIRST ARTICLE HERE)   I just completed a stint of

Shipping out: My Experiences on a Commercial Tanker (PART I)

By Captain George Stewart, USN (Retired) This is the first of three articles that describe my experiences while serving as an engineer aboard commercial tankers in 1961.  These articles provide perspective on the different engineering practices between the Navy and Merchant Marine in the post World War II-era. As will become apparent, there were some

BOOK REVIEW – Die Reise des Kreuzers Karlsruhe. Nov. 1931 – Dez. 1932. Tagebuch

By Kurt Gross, Edited by Simone C. De Santiago Ramos, Gerhard Hess Verlag, Bad Schussenried, Germany, (2013) Reviewed by Ingo Heidbrink, Ph.D. The diary of Kurt Gross, a petty officer of the German navy (Reichsmarine), covers the journey of the cruiser Karlsruhe to North and South America between November 1931 and December 1932. It is