bicheno elizabeths sea dogs

BOOK REVIEW – Elizabeth’s Sea Dogs: How the English Became the Scourge of the Sea

By Hugh Bicheno, Conway Press, United Kingdom, (2012). Reviewed by Mark Lardas Up to the last 50 years or so Britannia ruled the waves.  It remains able to project naval power. Many assume it was always that way, yet reality is different.  Britain’s naval dominance dates only to early modern times. From Roman times to

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BOOK REVIEW – Voyage to Jamestown: Practical Navigation in the Age of Discovery

By Robert D. Hicks, Naval Institute Press, Annapolis MD. (2011) Reviewed by Mark Lardas When Britain’s first North America colonies were established, transatlantic voyages were challenges analogous to trips to the Moon today. What did it take to sail the Atlantic four centuries ago? Voyage to Jamestown: Practical Navigation in the Age of Discovery; by

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BOOK REVIEW – CSS Alabama vs USS Kearsarge: Cherbourg 1864

By Mark Lardas, Osprey Publishing, (2011) Reviewed by Thomas P. Ostrom The author, Mark Lardas, brings a degree in naval architecture and marine engineering to his analysis of this epic American Civil War naval battle; as well as experience in writing as a military historian, and ship modeler. The book is enhanced with magnificent illustrations

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BOOK REVIEW – Lloyd’s Register: 250 Years of Service

By Nigel Watson, Lloyd’s Register, 2010 Reviewed by Mark Lardas In 1760, the Register Society was formed in Lloyd’s Coffee House. That organization is today’s Lloyd’s Register, one of the world’s most influential classification societies.  To celebrate 250 years of existence, Lloyd’s Registry published an official history of the organization, Lloyd’s Register: 250 Years of

jampoler horrible shipwreck

BOOK REVIEW – Horrible Shipwreck!

By Andrew C. A. Jampoler, Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, MD, (2010). Reviewed by Mark Lardas On August 31, 1833 the convict transport Amphitrite ran aground off Boulogne, France. By dawn of the next day, all aboard, except for three crew members, were dead, drowned when the incoming tide swamped the ship and battered the hull

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BOOK REVIEW – Great Lakes Warships, 1812-1815

By Mark Lardas, Osprey Publishing, Oxford, United Kingdom (2010) Reviewed by Diana L. Ahmad, Ph.D. For a book of only forty-eight pages, this publication provides an excellent overview of the Great Lakes ships of the War of 1812. An amateur historian, the author, Mark Lardas, trained as a Naval Architecture and Marine Engineer, but worked

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BOOK REVIEW: Steam Coffin – Captain Moses Rogers and the Steamship Savannah Break the Barrier

By John Laurence Busch, Hodos Historia, (2010), 726 pp. Reviewed by Mark Lardas On Thursday June 17, 1819 lookouts at the Cape Clear Island semaphore station sent a report to the Royal Navy base at Cork, Ireland that a ship was afire off Cape Clear. A revenue cutter sent to investigate discovered not a vessel