The Dunkirk Evacuation in 100 Objects

Martin Mace has a wealth of knowledge in writing about military history. Currently, he is the editor for Frontline Books and has over twenty years of experience in publishing and journalism. He has published several books on the subject and has co-authored multiple best-selling titles. In addition, he is the founding editor of Britain at

Character: The Ultimate Success Factor

With over 55-years of experience as a military leader and corporate executive, J. Phillip London has developed a singular guiding premise which directly relates one’s character to one’s success: “your character will absolutely determine the kind of life you will live.” (p. 18) He systematizes this concept in what he refers to as character-driven success,

The Great War in America

The First World War stands as the one of the great turning points in history. At its time, the most destructive human conflict ever experienced, the world before and after the war were distinctly different. Great empires fell, while others receded, new powers rose and ideas about patriotism, nationality, the role of class in society,

The ‘Stan

The ‘Stan is a collection of 17-short comic book style stories told by Afghanis and Americans having firsthand knowledge of America’s longest war. Each short cartoon briefly describes an individual’s personal story of the events leading up to the conflict and their roles during the actual war. While illustrated in cartoon form, the stories in

Second Acts: Presidential Lives and Legacies After the White House

Aside from what extraordinarily provocative stories we hear in the news today, few citizens are familiar with the U.S. presidents’ lives following their departure from Oval Office. Ex-presidents continue to have the highest celebrity status and use their influence in their follow-on efforts to support the current administration, help society through philanthropy, and focus on

Viet Nam Vignettes: Tales of the Magnificent Bastards

Viet Nam Vignettes is a memoir that outlines the experience of Gerald Gems from the time when he volunteered to enlist in Chicago (1966), to Marine Corps Boot Camp in San Diego, to his first assignment in Hawaii, to a combat tour in Viet Nam, and finally to his discharge and return to civilian life.

21st Century Knox

The Naval Institute’s 21st Century series on important military and naval figures seeks to review articles and writings of these figures and examine their relevance to the 21st Century.  Past volumes have examined the careers of Mahan, Patton, Soviet Admiral Gorshkov, Sims, Ellis, General Thomas Power, and Corbett. This latest book in the series examines

The Millionaires’ Unit

The Millionaires’ Unit tells the story of several Yale undergraduates in the early 1900s whose foresight helped open the United States Navy up to the utility of aerial operations.  American military aviation was woefully behind that of the European militaries when the US entered World War I. The Yale Unit was one of the critical

Seven at Santa Cruz

This biography follows World War II fighter pilot ace Stanley “Swede” Vejtasa from his Montana home, through numerous World War II aerial battles, to his post war service as the Air Boss on USS Essex (CV-9) and Captain of USS Constellation (CV-64). Vejtasa was known for his exploits against the Japanese in 1942. During the

US Revenue & Coast Guard Cutters in Naval Warfare

With the release of Thomas Ostrom’s latest book, he has delivered the companion to his 2012 work, The United States Coast Guard and National Defense: A History from World War I to the Present. In Ostrom’s fourth book, the reader is provided with extensive research on naval actions from the origin of the Revenue Marine

The Battleship Bismarck (Anatomy of The Ship)

In May 1941, after having sunk the HMS Hood, one of Britain’s most advanced warships, in spectacular fashion, the mighty German battleship Bismarck was put to the bottom of the sea only five months after being launched. Robert Ballard’s discovery of the wreck in 1989 triggered a surge of interest among the public, including the

Lee’s Real Plan at Gettysburg

It’s arguable that there is more written about the battle of Gettysburg than any other event in US military history. The events of 1-3 July 1863 are well-chronicled, well-dramatized. The dramatic exploits at Devil’s Den, on Little Round Top, and the grand charge of Maj. Gen. George Pickett’s division have all received comprehensive coverage, some