gilbert building for war wake

BOOK REVIEW – Building for War: The Epic Saga of the Civilian Contractors and Marines of Wake Island in World War II

By Bonita Gilbert, Casemate Publishers, Philadelphia (2012). Reviewed by Richard P. Hallion, Ph.D. Wake Island is justly remembered in the military history of the United States for the heroic stand made by its few defenders against the might of the Japanese empire. But while the exploits of the Navy and Marine personnel assigned to that

brown tingey

BOOK REVIEW – The Captain Who Burned His Ships: Captain Thomas Tingey, USN, 1750-1829

By Gordon S. Brown Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, (2011). Reviewed by John Grady Thomas Tingey was not a giant among the officers of the early American Navy, but his career as a midshipman in the Royal Navy sailing to Newfoundland and the Caribbean with few prospects of promotion, as a merchantman during and after the

symonds midway

BOOK REVIEW – The Battle of Midway

By Craig L. Symonds, Oxford University Press, Oxford & New York (2011). Reviewed by Rear Admiral William J. Holland Jr. U.S. Navy (Retired) Though titled after the single battle, the book’s narrative begins at the planning of the attack on Pearl Harbor, covers the activities and planning of both sides leading to the decisions to

USS Guardian (MCM 5) and the Navy’s Post-World War II Minesweepers

  By Captain George Stewart, USN (Retired) On 17 January, 2013, the USS Guardian (MCM 5) ran aground on Tubbataha Reef in the Philippines. The ship had gotten underway after a port call at Subic Bay. An investigation by US Naval authorities came to the conclusion that it was not practical to salvage the ship

Norman’s Corner: Analyzing Exercise Okean

By Norman Polmar (Editor’s note: This is the fourth in a series of blogs by Norman Polmar, author, analyst, and consultant specializing in the naval, aviation, and intelligence fields. Follow the full series here.) In the spring of 1970 I was working at my desk when the phone rang. I was an employee of the

Venomous

BOOK REVIEW – A Hard Fought Ship, The Story of HMS Venomous

By Robert J.Moore and John A. Rodgaard;  Holywell Publishing,  St. Albans, Hertfordshire, UK, (2010). Reviewed by Thomas C. Hone, Ph.D. This well-illustrated paperback book covers the career of a Royal Navy destroyer commissioned in 1919 and the experiences of the men who served in her. The book does a splendid job of giving the reader

USS Constitution Gavel

NHF Board Member Dr. Jack London Receives Nathan Hale Award From Reserve Officers Association

Dr. Jack London (Captain, USN, Retired), has been honored with the Nathan Hale Award from the Reserve Officers Association (ROA) at the organization’s 90th anniversary celebration at the Willard Hotel in Washington, D.C. The award is given to prominent federal, state, and local government and civic leaders to recognize outstanding and dedicated individual service in

National History Day - Dunn

National History Day Student Interviews Vice Admiral Dunn

The Naval Historical Foundation has been involved with National History Day since 1999. Each year, we sponsor the Captain Kenneth Coskey National History Day prize, a $500 award to the participants whose project best captures an appreciation for naval history. Last year, we had the pleasure of awarding the prize to three middle school students

NHF Historian Writes On 25th Anniversary of Black Sea Incidents

Twenty-five years ago there were a series of bumping incidents in the Black Sea between two Soviet frigates and the cruiser Yorktown (CG 48) and the destroyer USS Caron (DD 970). The incidents occurred as the American ships conducted an “innocent passage” of Soviet territorial waters near the Crimea. NHF historian Dr. David Winkler wrote

LT Gerald Ford on board USS MONTEREY,

Lieutenant Gerald Ford and Typhoon Cobra

In late January, shipyard workers carefully lifted the 555-ton island on to the flight deck of the Navy’s newest aircraft carrier at Newport News Shipbuilding Company in Virginia, a significant step in the journey towards the ship’s christening later this year (see photo below). CVN 78, the lead ship of a new class of nuclear-powered aircraft

Norman’s Corner: Louis Wolf and the Proceedings

By Norman Polmar (Editor’s note: This is the third in a series of blogs by Norman Polmar, author, analyst, and consultant specializing in the naval, aviation, and intelligence fields. Follow the full series here.) Long before the massive FBI building was erected on Ninth Street in northwest Washington, the few blocks between F Street and

LEGO USS Fletcher 1

NHF Historian Wins LEGO Shipbuilding Contest with 5 Foot Long Fletcher Class Destroyer

This past Saturday, the Hampton Roads Naval Museum (HRNM) held their second annual “Brick by Brick: LEGO Shipbuilding” contest. The event brought together those who love naval history, and those who love the iconic children’s construction blocks. The day-long event encouraged builders of all ages to bring in LEGO ships they had created at home,

USS Olympia, 1902. NH 42514

Saving Historic Ships: NHF Historian Pens Article in Current Issue of Proceedings

  The February Naval Institute Proceedings features an article by Naval Historical Foundation Historian Dr. David F. Winkler who looks at Historic Ships as an underutilized asset for the Navy in telling the Navy’s heritage story. The Naval Historical Foundation is an associate member to the Historic Naval Ships Association and has been supportive of

palmer george washingtons military genius

BOOK REVIEW – George Washington’s Military Genius

By Dave R. Palmer, Regnery Publishing, Washington, DC. (2012). Reviewed by Captain Roger F. Jones, U.S.Navy (Retired) This small book (only 230 pages of text) is a gem, in that it takes a brief premise which is developed simply, elegantly, and completely. One of the most enjoyable aspects is General Palmer’s masterly writing style, which

jordan warships after washington

BOOK REVIEW – Warships After Washington: The Development of the Five Major Fleets 1922-1930

By John Jordan, Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, MD. (2011). Reviewed by Larry A. Grant Warships After Washington: The Development of the Five Major Fleets 1922-1930 tells the story of the impact of the Washington Naval Treaty of 1922 on warship construction as the victorious nations tried to modernize their navies while facing financial strain, national