BOOK REVIEW – Tin Can Diary: The War Diary of Earl W. Foxwell, Jr.’s Tour of Duty Aboard The Destroyer USS Edwards, DD 619

By Harry J. Foxwel, Self Published, Middletown, DE (2015) Reviewed by Michael F. Solecki The destroyer is a light, fast, maneuverable, and heavily armed class of warship originally designed in the late 1800s to “destroy” torpedo boats. By World War II, these ships were designed and used to escort much larger ships and convoys filling

“FLIVVERS – THE FIRST STEAM TURBINE DRIVEN DESTROYERS

By George Stewart A “flivver” is an American slang term used in the early twentieth century to refer to any small car that gave a rough ride. These “flivvers” were primarily small, inexpensive and old. In the context of the United States Navy, “flivvers” refer to the two specific classes of destroyers that entered service

Shipping Out: My Experiences on a Commercial Tanker (Part III)

This is the third of three articles that describe my experiences while serving as an engineer aboard commercial tankers in 1961. These articles provide a perspective on the different engineering practices between the Navy and Merchant Marine in the post-World War II era.  (READ THE SECOND ARTICLE HERE)  In the summer of 1961, I relocated

Shipping out: My Experiences on a Commercial Tanker (PART I)

By Captain George Stewart, USN (Retired) This is the first of three articles that describe my experiences while serving as an engineer aboard commercial tankers in 1961.  These articles provide perspective on the different engineering practices between the Navy and Merchant Marine in the post World War II-era. As will become apparent, there were some

BOOK REVIEW – A Family Saga: Flush-Deck Destroyers 1917-1955

By Lt. Cdr. John L. Dickey; Revised by David W. McComb, Merriam Press, Bennington, VT, (2013) Reviewed by Samuel Loring Morison Not since the U.S. Naval Institute published Commander John Alden’s famous Flush Decks and Four Pipes in 1965 has such a study been published. A Family Saga is twice the length of Commander Alden’s

BOOK REVIEW – Imperial Japanese Navy Destroyers 1919-45 (2): Asashio to Tachibana Classes

By Mark Stille, Osprey Publishing, Oxford, United Kingdom, (2013) Reviewed by Diana L. Ahmad, Ph.D. This second volume about Japanese World War II destroyers continues Mark Stille’s excellent work.  Once again, the book provides many details about when the Japanese built the vessels, the changes implemented, and ultimately what happened to the ships. As with