Bunboat Diplomacy

By David F. Winkler, Ph.D. In past weeks there have been several reports of close interactions between Russia, the United States, and NATO armed forces, mostly close approaches with American fighters escorting Russian aircraft in the vicinity of Alaska, or Russian fighters maneuvering around NATO/American aircraft in the Baltic – Black Sea regions. Media discussions

Russian Spy Ship Off Delaware Brings Back Cold War Memories

By David F. Winkler, Ph.D. The spotting of a Russian surveillance ship 70 miles off of the Delaware coast is reminiscent of the Cold War. Of note back then, bathers on East Coast beaches could frequently spot the trawlers with the red stack bearing the familiar hammer and sickle. Back then, the U.S. only claimed

NHF Historian Attends Brussels Workshop

By NHF Staff Naval Historical Foundation historian Dr. David Winkler recently traveled to Brussels, Belgium, to participate in a workshop to discuss the “Avoidance of Hazardous Military Incidents.” With the relations between Russia and the NATO alliance in decline due to the annexation of Crimea, ongoing fighting in the Ukraine, and contentious issues elsewhere, the

Hiroshima Devastation Recalled

By David F. Winkler With tomorrow’s 71st anniversary of the dropping of the atomic bomb at Hiroshima which, following a second bomb drop at Nagasaki, led to the Japanese surrender ending World War II, we thought we would share a recent find from our ongoing naval history collection efforts. As part of the Naval Historical

HELL BELOW (PART II) REVIEW: Hitler’s Revenge

Reviewed by Dr. David Winkler Read our PART I review here. The second episode of the new Smithsonian series on undersea warfare during World War II continued with the devastating efforts of the Kriegsmarine U-boat fleet as the United States entered the war following the Japanese attack at Pearl Harbor. Growing up in Northern New

FDR’s Vision Fulfilled: A Visit to the National Museum of the Royal Navy

By David F. Winkler As the United States fought a two ocean war during World War II, the commander-in-chief had a post-war vision of a naval heritage complex with representative ships of the late 18th century, the Civil War era, the new Steel Navy, and World War I astride of an interpretive naval museum. To

Trust Began with a Lie

By David F. Winkler, Ph.D. NHF Staff Last Friday’s SU-27 barrel roll of USAF RC-135 and earlier buzzings of USN Destroyer are rare hiccups in 44 year INCSEA accord. The Incidents at Sea Agreement between the United States and the Soviet Union had only been signed a year earlier in Moscow by Secretary of the Navy John W. Warner and Admiral of

‘Hammerin’ Hank Mustin Oral History Posted

On April 11, 2016 the Naval Historical Foundation lost a strong supporter who was part of one of the Navy’s more storied families – Vice Admiral Henry C. Mustin. His grandfather, the first Henry C. Mustin, established his fame in naval aviation history when he was launched by catapult off the underway armored cruiser North

BOOK REVIEW – Striking the Hornet’s Nest: Naval Aviation and the Beginnings of Strategic Bombing in World War I

By Geoffrey L. Rossano and Thomas Wildenberg, Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, MD (2015) Reviewed by David F. Winkler, Ph.D. With the centennial of America’s entry into World War I just over a year away, the Naval Institute Press could not have timed the publication of this book any better. It’s understood that World War I

BOOK REVIEW – An Officer’s Story: A Politico-Military Journey

By Steve Kime, Authorhouse, Bloomington, IN (2015) Reviewed by David F. Winkler, Ph.D. One of the benefits of managing Naval History Book Reviews is that I get first dibs on incoming titles. Two decades ago, I interviewed Captain Steve Kime regarding his involvement with the Incidents at Sea Agreement negotiations and execution. He shared some

BOOK REVIEW – Ready Then, Ready Now, Ready Always: More Than a Century of Service by Citizen Sailors

By David F. Winkler, Navy Reserve Centennial Book Committee, Washington, DC. (2015) Reviewed by David F. Winkler, Ph.D. As managing editor of the Naval Historical Foundation’s Naval History Book Reviews I’m taking the prerogative of reviewing my own book as I have some thoughts about its production, content, and some subjects covered in the book