Lee’s Real Plan at Gettysburg

It’s arguable that there is more written about the battle of Gettysburg than any other event in US military history. The events of 1-3 July 1863 are well-chronicled, well-dramatized. The dramatic exploits at Devil’s Den, on Little Round Top, and the grand charge of Maj. Gen. George Pickett’s division have all received comprehensive coverage, some

Son of Virginia

So why is the Naval Historical Foundation reviewing a major political figure’s autobiography, first published in 2015, now available in paperback, but with no direct connection to the sea services? For this reviewer, it comes down to Doug Wilder’s descriptions of personal character as honed especially by his mother and leadership forged on Old Baldy

Deptford Royal Dockyard & Manor of Sayes Court

Your reviewer became vocational archaeologist by accident but is also an avocation historian (The Naval History of Great Britain, 206 pp., 1962, was my senior high school thesis). I am quite familiar with the MOLA publication series, having reviewed A Dated Type Series of London Medieval Pottery: Part 5, Shelly-sandy Ware and the Greyware Industries

The Gun Club: U.S.S. Duncan at Cape Esperance

For two months after its shocking defeat at the Battle of Savo Island, the USN conceded control by night of the waters around Guadalcanal to the Japanese surface navy. But on October 11, 1942, Rear Adm. Norman Scott moved in his cruiser/destroyer force to challenge this control for the first time. Just before midnight, he

The Golden Age of Piracy

Long before Walt Disney invited guests at Disneyland to “sail with the wildest crew that ever sacked the Spanish Main,” piracy has been a topic that has fascinated people – with a rather odd juxtaposition. While no one would want to encounter a real pirate, the aura of the pirate has captured the imagination to

New Interpretations in Naval History

New Interpretations in Naval History: Selected Papers from the 18th McMullen Naval Symposium Edited by Lori Lyn Bogle and James C. Rentfrow, Naval War College, (2018) Reviewed by Stephen D. Regan, Ed.D.   This collection of papers is a wonderful surprise. Usually scholarly historical symposium papers are pedantic, boring, poorly written treatises about obscure and

The Ghost Ship of Brooklyn

The Ghost Ship of Brooklyn: An Untold Story of the American Revolution By Robert P. Watson, Da Capo Press, (2017) Reviewed by Chief Warrant Officer Darien J. Garland, United States Marine Corps   Under dark and gray skies, the HMS Jersey sits ominously off the coast of Brooklyn in the calm waters of Wallabout Bay.

US Flush-Deck Destroyers 1916-1945

US Flush-Deck Destroyers 1916-45: Caldwell, Wickes and Clemson Classes (New Vanguard #259) By Mark Lardas, illustrated by Johnny Shumate & Julian Baker, Osprey Publishing, Oxford, (2018) Reviewed by Jeffrey Schultz   Mark Lardas’s US Flush-Deck Destroyers 1916-45 sheds light on the typically overlooked story of the WWI-era US Navy distinctive four funnel (or “four-piper”) destroyers.

Gunboats on the Great Lakes

Gunboats on the Great Lakes 1866-68, The British Navy’s show of force at the time of Confederation By Cheryl MacDonald, James Lorimer and Company, Toronto, (2017). Reviewed by John Grady   Gunboats of the Great Lakes is a “what if” book; and the “if” is directly connected to the untimely death of the author, Cheryl