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BOOK REVIEW – Soldiers and Civilization: How the Profession of Arms Thought and Fought the Modern World into Existence

By Reed Robert Bonadonna, Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, MD (2017) Reviewed by John R. Satterfield, DBA No one disputes that the growth and development of warfare have been functions of the advance of civilization, but the contributions of war to human progress may be less obvious.  Many argue that violent conflict reflects little more than

BOOK REVIEW – Knickerbocker Commodore: The Life and Times of John Drake Sloat 1781-1867

By Bruce A. Castleman, State University Press, Albany, NY (2016) Reviewed by Charles Bogart The reviewer doubts that today even one in a million Americans could identify Commodore John David Sloat; however, there was a time when he was well-known across the country. Depending on one’s political views, Commodore Sloat was praised or damned. This

BOOK REVIEW – Margaret Thatcher: A Life and Legacy

By David Cannadine, Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK (2017) Reviewed by John Grady This to-the-point, short biography of Margaret Thatcher, the United Kingdom’s longest-serving prime minister, provides some interesting political parallels to today’s United States — the rise of populism to give voice to those left behind, cries to scale back government, demands to unleash

BOOK REVIEW – Strategy: Context and Adaptation from Archidamus to Airpower

Edited by Richard J. Bailey, Jr., James W. Forsyth, Jr., and Mark O. Yesley, Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, MD (2016) Reviewed by Steven K. Stein, Ph.D. This collection of eleven essays by current or former faculty of the School of Advanced Air and Space Studies (SAASS) at Maxwell Air Force Base explores linkages between modern

BOOK REVIEW – Under a Blood Red Sun: The Remarkable Story of PT Boats in the Philippines and the Rescue of General MacArthur

By John J. Domagalski, Casemate Publishers, Philadelphia, PA (2016) Reviewed by John R. Satterfield, DBA Motor Torpedo Boat Squadron Three (MTB-3) joined the U.S. Navy’s Asiatic Fleet in the Philippines just three months before Japan attacked the islands on December 8, 1941.  Six boats and 82 sailors under Lt. John D. Bulkeley’s command performed remarkably

BOOK REVIEW – Fw 200 Condor Units of World War 2

By Chris Goss, Osprey Publishing, New York, NY (2016) Reviewed by Cdr. Peter Mersky, USNR (Ret.) This new book details one of World War II’s least known but, at the time, most efficient aircraft, if only for its psychological effect on allied, especially British, morale. For approximately three years, the Condor patrolled the convoy routes

BOOK REVIEW – The Japanese Navy in World War II: In The Words Of The Former Japanese Naval Officers (Second Edition)

Edited by David C. Evans, Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, MD (Hardcover,1986; Paperback, 2017) Reviewed By: Michael F. Solecki The Japanese Navy In World War II is a collection of interviews/essays previously published in various volumes of the United States Naval Institute’s Proceedings, as well as other publications from the 1950s and 1960s by former witnessing

BOOK REVIEW – 21st Century Corbett: Maritime Strategy and Naval Policy for the Modern Era

Andrew Lambert, ed., Naval Institute Press Annapolis MD (2017) Reviewed by Joseph Moretz, Ph.D. Announcing the death of Sir Julian Corbett in 1922, The Times of London believed the nation had lost ‘a naval historian of remarkable gifts.’ Corbett was certainly that, but he was also much more as Andrew Lambert ably amplifies in this

BOOK REVIEW – Chinese Naval Shipbuilding: An Ambitious and Uncertain Course

Andrew S. Erickson, Ed. Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, MD (2016) Reviewed by Dwayne Day, Ph.D. On April 26, China’s first indigenously-built aircraft carrier, still lacking a name, slipped into the sea. The smart-looking vessel bears a strong resemblance to China’s only operational carrier, built by the Soviets and bought from Ukraine. This new ship will

BOOK REVIEW – US Navy F-4 Phantom II Units of the Vietnam War 1964-68

By Peter E. Davies, Osprey Publishing, Oxford, UK and New York, NY (2016) Reviewed by Cdr. Peter Mersky, USNR (Ret.) No. 116 in the highly successful Combat Aircraft series from this prolific publisher and author, this new book is an excellent compilation of Navy squadrons that flew the F-4 in Southeast Asia. It’s one of

BOOK REVIEW – Route 9 Problem: The Battle for Lang Vei

By Dave Stockwell, Book Publishers Network (2016) Reviewed by Cdr. Peter B Mersky, USN (Ret.) The Vietnam War (roughly 1964-1973) was not only a series of albeit hard-fought, bloody aerial campaigns by aircrews who flew from hot, humid airfields throughout Southeast Asia, or the equally hot, humid undulating flight decks of Seventh Fleet carriers in

BOOK REVIEW – NAS South Weymouth: The Defender of Freedom

By AW1 Marc J. Frattasio, USNR (Ret), Self-Published (2016) Reviewed by Cdr. Peter D. Mersky, USN (Ret.) When you get a huge book like this with more than 700 heavily illustrated pages, it is a true labor of love. The author is a retired P-3 aircrewman and knows of which he writes. His wife is

BOOK REVIEW – Fort Enterprize

By Kevin Emmet Foley, Hellgate Press, Ashland, OR (2016) Reviewed by William H. White Fort Enterprize is listed and sold as “historical fiction.” It is certainly fiction, but its historical claim leaves much to be desired. When a writer injects a fictitious character or several into an accurately portrayed historical context, it’s historical fiction; when

BOOK REVIEW – America’s Sailors in the Great War: Seas, Skies, and Submarines

By Lisle A. Rose, University of Missouri Press, Columbia, MO (2016) Reviewed by Capt. Andrew C. A. Jampoler, USN (Ret.) Dr. Lisle Rose has taken on a challenge in this, his seventh book for the U. of M. Press. This history of U.S. Navy operations during World War I rightly begins by explaining that the