Battle of Lake Champlain Bicentennial Commemoration

This September 11th, the National Museum of the United States Navy will commemorate the two hundredth anniversary of the 1814 Battle of Lake Champlain, a magnificent tactical victory which proved vital in securing America’s future, with activities throughout the day. The Museum will host a number of events to commemorate the Battle of Lake Champlain.

BOOK REVIEW – Recent Works in the Naval War of 1812

The Naval War of 1812 “America’s Second War of Independence:” Collections of William I. Koch and the U.S. Naval Academy Museum By Dr. William S. Dudley with Dr. J. Scott Harmon, United States Naval Academy. Annapolis, MD, (2013) In Their Own Words: The Navy Fights the War of 1812 By Vice Adm. George W. Emery,

Call for Papers: “Who Burnt Whose Capital? The Royal Navy and Winning the War of 1812”

Keynote address by Professor Andrew Lambert, King’s College London, 5-6 September 2014 The War of 1812 was very much a maritime war and one that had its roots in contrasting approaches to the conduct of maritime warfare, especially belligerent and neutral rights. This conference will explore the War of 1812 and the role played by

Niagara model 1

Amateur Builder Completes Detailed Model of U.S. Brig Niagara

We’re always interested to hear about the ship model projects our members and friends are busy working on. We recently heard from NHF member Robert Allen, who has completed a detailed model of U.S. Brig Niagara, from the War of 1812. As we come up on the 200th anniversary of the great American victory in

vogel perilous fight

BOOK REVIEW – Through the Perilous Fight: Six Weeks that Saved the Nation

By Steve Vogel, Random House, New York, NY, (2013). Reviewed by John Grady Through the Perilous Fight is a wonderful and most welcome addition to the books commemorating the bicentennial of the War of 1812. Steve Vogel, veteran defense reporter for the Washington Post and author of The Pentagon: A History several years ago, tells the story of

wasp vs frolic

War of 1812 Exhibit Opening at Maryland Gallery this Weekend

Naval Historical Foundation Life Member James L. Kochan recently wrote to let us know that an exciting new exhibit is opening at his gallery this weekend. The second installment of Free Trade and Sailors’ Rights: The War of 1812 and the Shaping of America will open to public viewing at the Frederick, Maryland gallery of

daughan 1812 navys war

BOOK REVIEW – 1812: The Navy’s War

By George C. Daughan, Basic Books, New York, (2011). Reviewed by Rear Admiral William J. Holland, Jr. U.S. Navy (Retired) This is a splendid history. While documenting the courage, skill and luck of the tiny American Navy, Professor Daughan describes the machinations of the then principle players on a world stage in vastly greater breadth

InTheirOwnWords1812Emery

In Their Own Words: A New Look at the Naval War of 1812

  The emotions captured by the War of 1812: patriotic fervor, anxiety, the immediacy of the moment, the joy of peace… all and more abound in In Their Own Words. Whether encouraging peers, issuing orders to subordinates, lamenting a hero’s death or reporting a glorious frigate action, these emotions spring from the stirring contemporary letters,

utt-ships-oak-guns-iron

BOOK REVIEW – Ships of Oak, Guns of Iron: The War of 1812 and the Forging of the American Navy

By Ronald D. Utt,  Regnery Publishing, Washington, DC, (2012). Reviewed by David Curtis Skaggs, Ph.D. Entering the lists of War of 1812 naval history contenders is Ronald Utt’s Ships of Oak, Guns of Iron that seeks to demonstrate that this conflict forged the respected United States Navy that emerged in the nineteenth century. Or at

rutstein-privateering-stroke-salem-1812

BOOK REVIEW – The Privateering Stroke: Salem’s Privateers in the War of 1812

By Michael Rutstein, CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, Salem, MA (2012). Reviewed by James C. Bradford, Ph.D. Despite its important role in American defense policy from the Revolution through the War of 1812, privateering has never been the subject of a comprehensive study.  This accounts, in part, for the fact that privateering, i.e., the system of

william whittenbury

High School Student is Latest Addition to NHF Speakers Program

One of the services that the Naval Historical Foundation has provided to civic groups around the nation is a cadre of speakers who have naval history expertise developed through the study of naval history, or as a participant in historic events. Since 2000, the NHF has deployed dozens of individuals to address audiences from Maine

brown tingey

BOOK REVIEW – The Captain Who Burned His Ships: Captain Thomas Tingey, USN, 1750-1829

By Gordon S. Brown Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, (2011). Reviewed by John Grady Thomas Tingey was not a giant among the officers of the early American Navy, but his career as a midshipman in the Royal Navy sailing to Newfoundland and the Caribbean with few prospects of promotion, as a merchantman during and after the

lardas-great-lakes

BOOK REVIEW – Great Lakes Warships, 1812-1815

By Mark Lardas, Osprey Publishing, Oxford, United Kingdom (2010) Reviewed by Diana L. Ahmad, Ph.D. For a book of only forty-eight pages, this publication provides an excellent overview of the Great Lakes ships of the War of 1812. An amateur historian, the author, Mark Lardas, trained as a Naval Architecture and Marine Engineer, but worked

fitz-enz-hacks-sycophants-madison-war-1812

BOOK REVIEW – Hacks, Sycophants, Adventurers, and Heroes: Madison’s Commanders in the War of 1812

By David Fitz-Enz, Taylor Trade Publishing, New York, (2012). Reviewed by Thomas Sheppard While the literature on the War of 1812 is extensive – and growing rapidly amid bicentennial celebrations – David Fitz-Enz laments that few have the time or inclination to wade through most of the books published on the conflict, leading to widespread

herkalo-battle-plattsburgh-1814

BOOK REVIEW: The Battles at Plattsburgh, September 11, 1814

By Keith A. Herkalo,. History Press. Charleston, S.C (2012) Reviewed by David Curtis Skaggs, Ph.D. Of all largely ignored major military operations in what is often called America’s “forgotten war,” the Lake Champlain campaign of 1814 ranks in first place. Self-styled “amateur historian” Keith Herkalo brings enthusiasm and diligence to another inquiry into the battles