Norman’s Corner: The Father of Aegis

By Norman Polmar (Editor’s note: This is the 20th in a series of blogs by Norman Polmar—author, analyst, and consultant specializing in the naval, aviation, and intelligence fields. Follow the full series here.) In the mid-1970s my neighbors in Northern Virginia included Stu and Martha Landersman.  Stu was a Navy captain and a surface warfare

The Vanquished Here is the Victor of the Field: Army-Navy Football Rivalry During WWII

Tomorrow marks the 114th Army-Navy football game.  Due to a recent string of success (11 straight victories), Navy holds the current record at 57-49-7.  Navy football did not always dominate the storied rivalry.  During World War II, the rivalry between the Midshipmen and Black Knights was better than ever. Despite any misgivings the other service

Thomas O. Selfridge, Jr. and the USS Cairo: The “Jonah Man” of the Civil War Navy

Today, we commemorate the 151st anniversary of the sinking of the ironclad USS Cairo.  The Cairo sank in the river during the 1862 Yazoo Pass Expedition.  This article is the beginning of a series of articles in partnership with the Civil War Navy Sesquicentennial, an official U.S. Navy commemoration. Americans today revel in stories of people

The “Negative” Side of Naval History: John Hamilton’s Pearl Harbor Paintings

British artist John Hamilton was one of the world’s leading painters of World War II naval operations.  In an era before digital photography and photo manipulation, Hamilton’s paintings expertly capture the realism of combat at sea.  Part historian and part artist, John Hamilton was a major contributor to the history and memory of World War

I am well. Letter follows at first opportunity: Pearl Harbor Survivor Postcard

NHF Executive Director CAPT Todd Creekman, USN (Ret.) recalls an interesting vignette about the upcoming Pearl Harbor anniversary from one of our members. The story begins back in 2000.  Ms. June Ferren got in touch with Captain Creekman to ask for help in tracking down the story of her close friend who died during World

Limited Copies of THE NAVY Re-Release Now Available

The Naval Historical Foundation is pleased to announce the re-release of THE NAVY, the white hard-covered coffee table book published by Rizzoli International Inc. The original 2000 edition of THE NAVY, with over 300,000 copies in print, was one of the most successful books of the military coffee table book genre.  Yet the content quickly

Turkey, Giblet Gravy, and….Cigarettes? Former NHHC Staffer Reveals Holiday Menu Collection

If you follow any organization that studies naval history, chances are you have recently seen several ship and shore holiday menus posted or shared on their respective social media sites.   Institutions like the Naval History and Heritage Command, Puget Sound Naval Museum, Hampton Roads Naval Museum, and Battleship Cove are showcasing their unique collections of

Norman’s Corner: A Real Curmudgeon

By Norman Polmar (Editor’s note: This is the eighteenth in a series of blogs by Norman Polmar—author, analyst, and consultant specializing in the naval, aviation, and intelligence fields. Follow the full series here.) We often tend to use terms and words to describe people that, when we learn the true meaning of the word, often

Roy (camera)

Photographer Remembers Sinking of USS Yorktown (CV-5)

By CDR William G. Roy, USN(Ret). CDR Roy describes his experience as a member of the salvage party on board the aircraft carrier USS Yorktown (CV-5) during the Battle of Midway. CDR Roy is a long time Naval Historical Foundation member. I was a member of the Yorktown salvage party. I volunteered 5 June 1942.

Membership

Connecting Naval History to our Economy, the Environment & National Security Naval history and the maritime domain connect every aspect of our nation’s history – national security, the economy, the environment and foreign policy. Whether documenting naval strategies that protect our interests, capturing oral and video histories, securing artifacts or digitizing important naval records and artwork,