In Death Unafraid: History, Memory, and the USS Maine (Part II)

In Death Unafraid is a two part blog miniseries chronicling the history and memory of the USS Maine from 1898 to present.  Read PART I here.    Part II: Worse Than Hell When riots broke out in Havana at the beginning of 1898, the McKinley government sent the battleship Maine there to protect American interests

A Stag Party with President Truman and Some Fleet Admirals

On May 6, 1947, a party was held in Washington, D.C.  Among the honored guests there: A president, a few politicians, and a majority of the most important and influential officers in United States military history.  They all came to the “stag party” (according to President Truman’s presidential diary entry) to honor General George Marshall,

World War I-Era Naval Aviation Material donated to National Naval Aviation Museum

The Naval Historical Foundation recently received some very interesting pieces of naval aviation memorabilia from the descendants of Ensign Dudley C. Lunt, USNRF.  Lunt enlisted in the Naval Reserve in March 1918 and was called into active service shortly thereafter.  He found himself at a ground school for aviation cadets at the Massachusetts Institute of

Shipping Out: My Experiences on a Commercial Tanker (Part III)

This is the third of three articles that describe my experiences while serving as an engineer aboard commercial tankers in 1961. These articles provide a perspective on the different engineering practices between the Navy and Merchant Marine in the post-World War II era.  (READ THE SECOND ARTICLE HERE)  In the summer of 1961, I relocated

In Death Unafraid: History, Memory, and the USS Maine (Part I)

In Death Unafraid is a two part blog miniseries chronicling the history and memory of the USS Maine from 1898 to present.   Newspaper Reaction to the Sinking of the Maine  Part I: Garish Marble The week before I started my job at the Naval Historical Foundation, my wife and I took a trip to

Norman’s Corner: My Adopted Brother

By Norman Polmar (Editor’s note: This is the 24th in a series of blogs by Norman Polmar—author, analyst, and consultant specializing in the naval, aviation, and intelligence fields. Follow the full series here.) The U.S. nuclear attack submarine Thresher sank during sea trials off the New England coast on 10 April 1963, with the loss

Former NHF Staff Member Completes LEGO USS Lexington Model

By Dave Colamaria This week is the annual LEGO Shipbuilding Contest at the Hampton Roads Naval Museum, and I’ve finished my contribution to the event in the nick of time. This weekend I completed work on a 7 foot long version of the aircraft carrier USS Lexington (CV 2). The project took me a little

Shipping Out: My Experiences on a Commercial Tanker (Part II)

This is the second of three articles that describe my experiences while serving as an engineer aboard commercial tankers in 1961. These articles provide a perspective on the different engineering practices between the Navy and Merchant Marine in the post-World War II era.  (READ THE FIRST ARTICLE HERE)   I just completed a stint of

Norman’s Corner: An Airman’s Airman

By Norman Polmar (Editor’s note: This is the 23nd in a series of blogs by Norman Polmar—author, analyst, and consultant specializing in the naval, aviation, and intelligence fields. Follow the full series here.) I knew Don Engen for a very brief period. Still, he had a significant influence on me. Vice Admiral Engen dropped out

Shipping out: My Experiences on a Commercial Tanker (PART I)

By Captain George Stewart, USN (Retired) This is the first of three articles that describe my experiences while serving as an engineer aboard commercial tankers in 1961.  These articles provide perspective on the different engineering practices between the Navy and Merchant Marine in the post World War II-era. As will become apparent, there were some

Remembering Admiral Kinnaird McKee

“Kin had the intelligence, integrity and industry in a measure you rarely see. He had the ability to voice the unpopular truth, to say, in a gathering, what others wished they  had the nerve to utter.” Bruce DeMars Admiral U.S. Navy (Retired) NHF Chairman  “Smart, no-nonsense, dedicated, always focused on the job.  first classmate to

McPherson at SMH Dinner: “The Moral Courage of Risk Taking”

By John Grady The Navy was more successful in its campaigns like Port Royal, S.C. and New Orleans than the Army during the American Civil War particularly in the Virginia Theater.  According to Pulitzer Prize-winning author James McPherson, it was “partially due to the professionalism of Navy leadership in high positions.”  Dr. McPherson answered these

The LEGO Lady Lex: Building a Seven Foot Long Aircraft Carrier Model Out of Plastic Bricks

By Dave Colamaria I was excited to hear that the Naval Historical Foundation is working with the Hampton Roads Naval Museum on the 2014 LEGO Shipbuilding Program this coming February. I had a great time at last year’s event (see the story here) and I thought a lot over the past year about a follow-up

WNY Then and Now: Building No. 142 and 201

We would like to introduce a new segment to the NHF Blog page: Washington Navy Yard: Then and Now.  We will be showing the growth and changes in Washington Navy Yard history from yesterday through today.  Today’s images discuss Building 201, just a few blocks from the National Museum of the United States Navy. The

Vice Admiral Michelle Howard and the Wind of Change for Military Women

  “Men have the luxury of being average.  When you walk in as a woman, that assumption does not come with you.” –  Michelle Howard, Commander, USS Rushmore, Time Magazine, 2000.   This blog discusses American naval history. History, by definition, is a study of the past. It is a very rare and special treat