Captain Dudley Knox NH 48459

NHF Announces Knox Prize for Naval History

In the minutes of the 1948 annual meeting of the Naval Historical Foundation that detailed a post-World War II fundraising campaign led by NHF President Fleet Admiral Ernest King for a naval museum that would open in downtown Washington in May 1950, the secretary wrote: No member of the Foundation, new or old, will need

Call for Papers – Naval and Maritime Power in Two World Wars: Contemporary Relevance and Historical Importance

11-12 April 2014 Greenwich Maritime Institute, University of Greenwich Global War Studies and the Greenwich Maritime Institute are pleased to announce an international conference on the naval and maritime history of the First and Second World Wars. On the centenary of the First World War, the conference seeks to promote an international and interdisciplinary dialogue


BOOK REVIEW – Fighting for MacArthur: The Navy and Marine Corps’ Desperate Defense of the Philippines

By John Gordon, Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, MD, (2011). Reviewed by Captain Roger F. Jones, U.S. Navy (Retired) This is a book well worth reading from several standpoints. First, the role of the Navy and Marine Corps in the defense of the Philippines in World War II, as compared to the Army, is not generally


BOOK REVIEW – McNamara, Clifford, and the Burdens of Vietnam, 1965-69

By Edward J. Drea, Washington, D.C.:Historical Office, Office of the Secretary of Defense, (2011). Reviewed by Dr. Richard P. Hallion The historians within the Office of the Secretary of Defense have established an enviable reputation for meticulously researched and well-crafted books, particularly their series on the various Secretaries of Defense. Edward J. Drea’s impressive new

Norman’s Corner: Pointing to General Genda

By Norman Polmar (Editor’s note: This is the seventh in a series of blogs by Norman Polmar, author, analyst, and consultant specializing in the naval, aviation, and intelligence fields. Follow the full series here.) While in high school I became interested in the Japanese surprise attack on Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941. As I

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Naval Aviators Visit Cold War Gallery

  On 3 April 2013, three retired naval aviators paid their first visit to the Cold War Gallery at the Washington Navy Yard, to view some of the Navy Museum’s newest exhibits. Of particular interest to them was the Ready Room Theater, a replica of an aircraft carrier squadron ready room. The three aviators, Rear

william whittenbury

High School Student is Latest Addition to NHF Speakers Program

One of the services that the Naval Historical Foundation has provided to civic groups around the nation is a cadre of speakers who have naval history expertise developed through the study of naval history, or as a participant in historic events. Since 2000, the NHF has deployed dozens of individuals to address audiences from Maine

Beach USN 710690 L-File

Norman’s Corner: Disappointing Captain Beach

By Norman Polmar (Editor’s note: This is the sixth in a series of blogs by Norman Polmar, author, analyst, and consultant specializing in the naval, aviation, and intelligence fields. Follow the full series here.) As mentioned in previous blogs, in the early 1960s I was befriended by then-Captain F.J. (Fritz) Harlfinger and then-Commander Dominic Paolucci.


Celebrating Women’s History Month at the Naval Historical Foundation

Responding to the Navy’s Women’s History Month theme of “Women Inspiring Innovation through Imagination: Celebrating Women in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics,” the Naval Historical Foundation participated in Women’s History Month by co-hosting an event with the Hopper Information Services Center, Office of Naval Intelligence (ONI), at the National Museum of the U.S. Navy on

BOOK REVIEW – The Admirals: Nimitz, Halsey, Leahy, and King – The Five-Star Admirals Who Won the War at Sea

By Walter R. Borneman, Little, Brown and Company, New York, NY (2012). Reviewed by Captain Scott Mobley, U.S. Navy (Retired) Millions of men and women have served in the U.S. Navy since its founding more than two centuries ago, but only four attained five-star status. The circumstances of World War II propelled this quartet—William D.


BOOK REVIEW – The Twilight War: The Secret History of America’s Thirty Year Conflict with Iran

By David Crist, Ph.D. Penquin Press, New York, NY (2012) Reviewed by Stephen Phillips The Cold War by definition gave birth to several proxy wars. Concern over the Soviet Union’s potential impact on the oil producing Middle East led the U.S. to support Shah of Iran. Though secular, the Shah became extremely oppressive and thus


BOOK REVIEWS – A Dog Before A Soldier: Almost-lost Episodes in the U.S. Navy’s Civil War

By Chuck Veit, Self-Published, United States (2010) Reviewed by Nathan Albright Chuck Veit, the President of the Naval & Marine Living History Association and founder of the U.S. Naval Landing Party, has managed an impressive feat in A Dog Before A Soldier. In this self-published collection of essays, Veit has written something that will be


BOOK REVIEW – Isaiah’s Eagles Rising: A Generation of Airmen (Second Edition)

By Bernard Thomas Nolan, Xlibris Corporation, Bloomington, IN (2012). Reviewed by Richard P. Hallion, Ph.D. Privately published memoirs constitute a mixed-bag of literature, with many generally offering more opinion than substance. However, bomber pilot Bernard Thomas Nolan’s Isaiah’s Eagles Rising constitutes a very definite exception to this “rule.” It is at times a gripping account


BOOK REVIEW – Normandy: A Graphic History of D-Day

Written and Illustrated by Wayne Vansant. Zenith Press, Minneapolis, MN. (2012) Reviewed by John R. Satterfield, DBA. Scholars, writers, history buffs, movie producers and participants have minutely explored D-Day and the Normandy campaign. Thanks to thousands of books, articles and dramatic and documentary films, we are able to trace the activities and experiences of nearly