BOOK REVIEW – Destroyerman

By John T. Pigott, (2006) Reviewed by Rear Admiral Peter B. Booth, U.S. Navy (Retired) The whaleboat was deep in the water, grossly overloaded with sailors hauled from the ocean. I grabbed the oil-soaked life jacket of the sailor who would have brought our total to thirty-five, and had started to heave him aboard when

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Navy Museum Store – August Blowout Sale!

For the entire month of August enjoy a 10% discount on all items, including marked down items. Check with the Navy Museum Store (202) 889-2212 (located in the Navy Museum, Building 76) or the Naval Historical Foundation (202) 678-4333 (located in Building 57) for further details. And be sure to check out the selection of

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Life on a Fletcher Class Destroyer in the 1950’s

  By Captain George Stewart, USN (Retired) This is the first of a series of articles describing life in the 1950s on a World War II built Fletcher Class Destroyer. My connection to these ships began as I was approaching graduation from the Massachusetts Maritime Academy in August of 1956. Due to a change in

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Navy Museum and Cold War Gallery Accessible by Anacostia Riverwalk in August

  For the month of August, Naval History and Heritage Command along with the support of Naval District Washington, will offer free public access via the Anacostia Riverwalk Trail to the newly opened Cold War Gallery, the National Museum of the U.S. Navy and destroyer Display Ship Barry. The only day the museums will not

2013 Brigadier General James L. Collins Jr. Book Prize in Military History

The U.S. Commission on Military History announces the 2013 Brigadier General James L. Collins Jr. Book Prize in Military History. The prize entails a $1,000 award to the author of any nationality of the best book written in English on any field of military history published during 2012. The Book Prize Committee, chaired by Dr.

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Norman’s Corner: Working with Academician I.D. Spassky

By Norman Polmar (Editor’s note: This is the twelfth in a series of blogs by Norman Polmar, author, analyst, and consultant specializing in the naval, aviation, and intelligence fields. Follow the full series here.) In 1991 the U.S. Naval Institute published my book Submarines of the Russian and Soviet Navies 1718—1990, written in collaboration with

Doyle Donation July 2013

Huge Donation of Used Books to Naval Historical Foundation

  Earlier this month, we were thrilled to receive an enormous donation of used books on naval history from donor Cynthia Doyle. The books were from the collection of her brother Philip, who passed away recently. For a full week, boxes arrived at our offices, loaded with several hundred books, ranging from small paperbacks to

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2013 STEM-H Teacher Fellows Selected

The Submarine Force Library and Museum Association, Historic Ship Nautilus, and the Naval Historical Foundation are pleased to announce the selectees for the 2013 Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics, and History (STEM-H) Teacher Fellowships. From July 22 to August 2, the selectees will use the exhibits of the Submarine Force Museum and Historic Ship Nautilus to

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Navy Department Library Looking for Back Issues of Proceedings

The Navy Department Library, located at the Washington Navy Yard, is a one of a kind repository of all things Navy. We work closely with the library, on projects such as used book donations, and the acquisition of rare books and donations for their collection. At the moment, we’re trying to help them fill out

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BOOK REVIEW – Defender Dolphins: The Story of Project Short Time, A Brief History of the U.S. Navy’s First Marine Mammal Swimmer Defense System

By Harold Goforth, Fortis Publications, United Kingdom, (2013). Reviewed by Stephen Phillips Asymmetric tactics are the hallmark of battlefield victory for an insurgency. In the Vietnam War, the Viet Cong employed sappers – those who use explosives to destroy a specified target – to great effect. In his book Defender Dolphins: The Story of Project

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BOOK REVIEW – Path Breakers: U.S. Marine African American Officers in Their Own Words

Compiled and edited by Dr. Fred Allison and Colonel Kurtis Wheeler USMCR, US Marine Corps History Division, Quantico, VA (2012). Reviewed by Colonel Curt Marsh, USMCR (Retired) Path Breakers is a worthy addition to the story of the ongoing struggle by the Marine Corps to address diversity and build an officer corps that is more

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BOOK REVIEW – Invading America: The British Assault on the New World, 1497-1630

By David Childs, Seaforth Publishing, South Yorkshire, UK, (2012). Reviewed by Thomas Sheppard The arrival of British settlers in the so-called “New World” has been characterized at various times as a discovery, an encounter, or even a clash of civilizations. All these descriptions have merit, but David Childs contends that perhaps the century of English

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BOOK REVIEW – Mayday: The Decline of American Naval Supremacy

By Seth Cropsey, Overlook Duckworth, New York, NY, (2013). Reviewed by Harvey M. Sapolsky, Ph.D. Seth Cropsey, a Navy secretariat official in Ronald Reagan and George H. W. Bush administrations and currently a Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute, is worried about the future of the U.S. Navy and the fate of the nation. Because

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BOOK REVIEW – The Silent Service in World War II: The Story of the U.S. Navy Submarine Force in the Words of the Men Who Lived It

By Edward Monroe-Jones and Michael Green, eds., Havertown, PA, Casemate (2012). Reviewed by Charles C. Kolb, Ph.D. The editors have assembled an anthology of 46 oral histories of variable lengths that focus on stories of men as well as old S- and newer fleet-type boats that fought against the Japanese during World War II in

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BOOK REVIEW – Fatal Dive: Solving the World War II Mystery of the USS Grunion

By Peter F. Stevens, Regnery History, Washington, DC, (2012). Reviewed by Greg Stitz USS Grunion (SS 216) was already under construction when the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor thrust America into World War II. Her keel had been laid at the Electric Boat Company shipyard in Groton, CT on 1 March 1941. Christened and launched