BOOK REVIEW – The British Raid on Essex: The Forgotten Battle of the War of 1812

By Jerry Roberts, Wesleyan University Press, Middletown, CT (2014) Reviewed by David Curtis Skaggs, Ph.D, COL USAR (Ret.) On the night of April 7, 1814, Cmdr. Richard Coote and a party of 136 Royal Navy sailors and Royal Marines began a raid over the bar at the mouth of the Connecticut River and rowed up

BOOK REVIEW – South Pacific Cauldron: World War II’s Great Forgotten Battlegrounds

By Alan Rems, Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, MD (2014) Reviewed by John R. Satterfield, DBA Although an amateur historian, author Rems has produced a very professional volume.  His book is the only recent one-volume account of World War II’s Southwest Pacific Theater that treats its numerous campaigns, both comprehensively and chronologically. This is valuable for

BOOK REVIEW – The Liberty Incident Revealed: The Definitive Account of the 1967 Israeli Attack on the U.S. Navy Spy Ship

By A. Jay Cristol, Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, MD (2013) Reviewed by Stephen Phillips On June 8, 1967, Israeli air and naval forces engaged in the Arab-Israeli Six Day War      attacked USS Liberty (AGTR 5), killing 34 and wounding 171 Americans. The incident immediately caused a conflagration of controversy. Most accusations assert premeditation. Some suggest

Victor Delano, Naval Hero and Friend of NHF, Passes

The Naval Historical Foundation lost a good friend and dedicated member last week. Victor Delano, U.S. Navy Captain (retired) and Pearl Harbor survivor, died on Monday, August 25th, at Casey House in Rockville, Maryland. Delano was 94 years old. Delano was born into a family legacy of Navy Veterans. His father, Captain Harvey Delano, was

Men and Women of Steel: A Labor Day Tribute to Navy Civilians in Times of Peace and War (Photo Essay)

It is incredibly difficult to go “full speed ahead” without a ship to sail. If it was not for the skilled hands that crafted the 8-inch barrels, Captain Charles Gridley could not fire Olympia’s guns at Manila Bay. Do sailors alone win the great victories and triumphs of our naval history? Without the help of

Air Medals Awarded to Vietnam Naval Aviators

“This is Blackbeard on board Newport News with a shore bombardment force in Haiphong Harbor. We are engaged with several enemy surface units and need illumination to sort things out. Any aircraft in the area give me a call on guard. What we really need are high-powered flares. Blackbeard out.”          

So Much More to Learn: Interns Learn History and Hard Work at NMUSN

Last week, we published a short story on the experiences of our 2014 summertime interns. The post served as a starting point to a series of articles highlighting internships at the Naval Historical Foundation and our friends at the Naval History and Heritage Command and their museum institutions around the country. Everyone needs a good

2014 NHF Summer Interns Weigh in on Naval History

Last week, our summer interns wrapped up their time here at NHF. Thankfully, each intern took a few moments to answer a few questions about their experiences working with the Foundation. Thanks again to Alicia, Aaron, and Ross (not interviewed) for a wonderful summer! Alicia Petersen Senior University of South Florida History/Biomedical Sciences What interests

Carpe Diem: Robin Williams Has a Place in Naval History

By Matthew Eng NHF Digital Content Developer Many of us were shocked with the news of actor/comedian Robin Williams’s passing. Stories are now surfacing about his passions and pursuits outside of the Hollywood spotlight. This includes his profound love and support of the military.  He became a mainstay for USO tours overseas in recent years,

USS McCaffery Cruisebooks Donated to the Navy Department Library

Last Thursday, members of the USS McCaffery Shipmates Association stopped by the Naval Historical Foundation to donate a set of her cruise books to the Navy Department Library. Don Turk (’69-’71) and Doug Hackett (’61-’63), two former sailors who served on USS McCaffrey (DD/DDE 860), take great pride in their time aboard the Cold War-era

From LA-Class to Classroom: STEM-H Fellows Study the Science of Submarines

By Matthew T. Eng Digital Content Developer, NHF Several weeks ago, I had the pleasure to spend an afternoon with the 2014 STEM-H fellowship teachers at the Submarine Force Library and Museum in Groton, CT. This year marks the second STEM-H fellowship in Groton and the sixth overall. The previous four fellowships were held at

BOOK REVIEW – America’s First Frogman: The Draper Kauffman Story

By Elizabeth Kauffman Bush, Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, MD (2004) Reviewed by Stephen Phillips There is a World War II American serviceman who fits the description of being the “right man at the right time.” Although he wanted to serve in the U.S. Navy, he was denied a commission in 1933 due to poor eyesight.

BOOK REVIEW – Sting of the Drone

By Richard A. Clarke, Thomas Dunne Books, St. Martin’s Press, New York, NY (2014) Reviewed by Stephen Phillips Unmanned vehicles represent the most recent revolution in military technology, especially those capable of launching weapons. Like any paradigm shift, their entry onto the battlefield has been followed by controversy as to the appropriate means to employ

BOOK REVIEW – Commerce Raiding: Historical Case Studies, 1755-2009

Edited by Bruce A. Elleman and S. C. M. Paine, Naval War College Press, Newport, RI (2013) Reviewed by Joseph James Ahern Authors Bruce A. Elleman and S. C. M. Paine have gathered sixteen case studies examining the use and development of guerre de course from the eighteenth to twenty-first centuries in the recent addition