U.S. Navy Baseball History Exhibit Opens at Puget Sound Navy Museum

By Megan Churchwell Museum  Curator Puget Sound Navy Museum The Puget Sound Navy Museum in Bremerton, Washington is excited to announce the opening of a new exhibit on March 4th. “When Baseball Went to War” explores the history of U.S. Navy baseball from its earliest years through World War II. Baseball was among the earliest

A Pilgrimage to Honor and Remember My POW Husband

In 2016, the Naval Historical Foundation is celebrating its 90th year as a non-profit institution. We are highlighting stories that honor our commitment to preserve, educate, and commemorate naval history. Retired Navy Captain and former Vietnam POW Ken L. Coskey remains a central figure in the storied history of this Foundation. This  onth marks the

New Masters Degree in Naval History Offered Through Distance Learning at University of Portsmouth

The University of Portsmouth is currently preparing a new program for students interested in British Naval History beginning in September 2016. The course offers real-life learning experiences working with archives and museums, as well as the opportunity to develop key transferable skills, such as independent learning, written communication, textual analysis and time management. This course also

Norfolk Shipbuilding Event is Building Block for Fun and Learning

By Matthew T. Eng On 6 February, the Hampton Roads Naval Museum (HRNM) hosted their fifth annual “Brick by Brick” LEGO Shipbuilding event. This yearly gathering of brick aficionados and enthusiasts in Norfolk, VA, has quickly become the museum’s signature event. This year marks the third time that the Naval Historical Foundation has supported HRNM

Generous Donation Helps Preserve and Make Accessible Valuable Navy Art

In 2016, the Naval Historical Foundation is celebrating its 90th year as a non-profit institution. As a testament to our Foundation’s mission to preserve, educate, and commemorate, we are highlighting instances where we are actively seeking out ways to keep naval history alive for generations to come. By NHF Staff The Navy Art Collection, most

Building for Victory: Interview with LEGO USS Indianapolis Designer

If you are a fan or follower of the Naval Historical Foundation, you know that NHF has been involved with the Hampton Roads Naval Museum’s (HRNM) blockbuster LEGO Shipbuilding event for several years. The generous donation NHF provided this year to HRNM helped pay for a large quantity of DUPLO bricks for the event’s “youngest

Correspondence and Records of Early Navy Submariner Catalogued

In 2016, the Naval Historical Foundation will celebrate its 90th year as a non-profit institution. As a testament to our Foundation’s principle to preserve, educate, and commemorate, we want to highlight stories where we are actively seeking out ways to keep naval history alive for generations to come. As the United States begins to commemorate

BOOK REVIEW – Thomas Jefferson and the Tripoli Pirates: The Forgotten War That Changed American History

By Brian Kilmeade, Sentinel, Random House, New York, NY (2015) Reviewed by Vice Admiral Robert F. Dunn, U.S. Navy (Retired)  Written in lively style this book is both informative and a quick read. For most readers of Pull Together it will be a review of episodes in the early Navy, important to the history but

BOOK REVIEW – An Officer’s Story: A Politico-Military Journey

By Steve Kime, Authorhouse, Bloomington, IN (2015) Reviewed by David F. Winkler, Ph.D. One of the benefits of managing Naval History Book Reviews is that I get first dibs on incoming titles. Two decades ago, I interviewed Captain Steve Kime regarding his involvement with the Incidents at Sea Agreement negotiations and execution. He shared some

BOOK REVIEW – Torch: North Africa and the Allied Path to Victory

By Vincent P. O’Hara, Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, MD (2015) Reviewed by John R. Satterfield, DBA America entered World War II after Japan attacked Pearl Harbor in December 1941. The nation focused on war in the Pacific through most of 1942.  However, the U.S. had established its “Germany First” strategy by 1940. Defeating the Axis

BOOK REVIEW – In the Shadow of the Alabama: The British Foreign Office and the American Civil War

By Renata Eley Long, Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, MD (2015) Reviewed by Kenneth J. Blume, Ph.D. Built and launched at the Laird shipyard in 1862, CSS Alabama became the most notorious of the Confederacy’s commerce raiders, devastating Union merchant shipping and contributing to an irreversible “flight from the flag.” Her career ended two years later

BOOK REVIEW – T.E. Lawrence and the Red Sea Patrol: The Royal Navy’s Role in Creating the Legend

By John Johnson-Allen, Pen & Sword Military, South Yorkshire, England (2015) Reviewed by Diana L. Ahmad, Ph.D. Thoughts about World War I often bring up images of trench warfare, Big Bertha, and the battles at Liège and Flanders Fields, but rarely does the conflict to protect the Suez Canal enter into the reader’s mind.  John

BOOK REVIEW – Merchant Sailors at War 1943 – 1945: Beating the U-Boat

By Philip Kaplan, Pen & Sword, London, UK (2015) Reviewed by Charles H. Bogart Over the years, Pen & Sword have issued a number of Images of War books. This book is sub-titled Merchant Ships at War 1943 – 1945: Beating the U-Boats. The book consists of eight chapters, with each chapter introduced by three

BOOK REVIEW – A History of the Royal Danish Navy 1510-2010

By Hans Christian Bjerg, The Royal Danish Navy, Copenhagen, Denmark (2015) Reviewed by Mark Lardas Hans Christian Berg’s A History of the Royal Danish Navy 1510-2010 offers a brief yet comprehensive account of the Royal Danish Navy’s rich heritage in a new English language translation. The Royal Danish Navy, as it was formally established in

BOOK REVIEW – Navies and Soft Power: Historical Case Studies of Naval Power and the Nonuse of Military Force

Edited by Bruce A. Elleman and S.C.M. Paine, Naval War College Press, Newport, RI (2016) Reviewed by Nathan Albright Although each paper in this collection contains a disclaimer that the “thoughts and opinions expressed [. . .] are not necessarily those of the U.S. Government, the U.S. Navy Department, or the Naval War College (198),”