Yale Professor Awarded Hattendorf Prize

 NEW HAVEN, Conn. (Nov. 20, 2014) U.S. Naval War College (NWC) president Rear Adm. P. Gardner Howe III and NWC professor John B. Hattendorf present Yale University professor Paul M. Kennedy the Hattendorf Prize for Distinguished Original Research in Maritime History, Nov. 20, at Yale. First awarded in 2011, the prize is made to an individual who has made world-class achievement in original research, contributing to a deeper historical understanding of the broad context and interrelationships involved in the roles, contributions, limitations and uses of the sea services in history. (Courtesy photo)


NEW HAVEN, Conn. (Nov. 20, 2014) U.S. Naval War College (NWC) president Rear Adm. P. Gardner Howe III and NWC professor John B. Hattendorf present Yale University professor Paul M. Kennedy the Hattendorf Prize for Distinguished Original Research in Maritime History, Nov. 20, at Yale. First awarded in 2011, the prize is made to an individual who has made world-class achievement in original research, contributing to a deeper historical understanding of the broad context and interrelationships involved in the roles, contributions, limitations and uses of the sea services in history. (Courtesy photo)


From Naval War College Museum
Dec. 4, 2014

NEW HAVEN, Conn. – Paul M. Kennedy, the J. Richardson Dilworth professor of history at Yale University, was presented the Hattendorf Prize for Distinguished Original Research in Maritime History by U.S. Naval War College (NWC) president Rear Adm. P. Gardner Howe III, Nov. 20, at Yale.

The ceremony, attended by NWC professor John B. Hattendorf, for whom the prize is named, took place during Kennedy’s military history class in Luce Hall Auditorium, where Hattendorf provided a guest lecture on “Sea Power since 1945.”

In presenting the award, Howe recognized Kennedy for his innovative and wide-ranging approach to the writing of naval history, inspiring scholars to examine the importance of sea power and shaping the course of international history.

“This impressive body of historical scholarship has influenced the work not only of other historians, but a much wider audience,” said Howe. “By breaking down barriers to interdisciplinary study, by integrating a wide range of knowledge, and by making a contribution to policy discussions, your works have themselves become prizes for us to read.”

Kennedy has written compelling narratives that show the interrelationship of sea power and land power, technological innovation and naval warfare, economic wherewithal and naval strength, and grand strategy and high politics.

Howe emphasized that the award honors both Kennedy and his work, expressing appreciation for distinguished academic research, insight and writing that contributes to a deeper understanding of the influence of sea power and the rise and fall of great powers.

The Hattendorf Prize is made to an individual who has made world-class achievement in original research, contributing to a deeper historical understanding of the broad context and interrelationships involved in the roles, contributions, limitations and uses of the sea services in history.

Among the many achievements of Kennedy are his studies on the British Royal Navy and the role of navies in the rise and fall of great powers, earning him an international reputation and following.

He is the second Hattendorf Prize Laureate.

First awarded in 2011, the prize is made possible through the generosity of the NWC Foundation. It is awarded at two- or three-year intervals, providing a $10,000 cash prize with a citation and bronze medal.

Edited and posted by Daniel S. Marciniak

 

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